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The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

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The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is a 3D platformer for the Nintendo 64, was one of
The Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time box art

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

the first 3D video games, and was the first 3D Zelda game.  Due to it's plot involving time travel, many theories have come up within the fanbase regarding the game over the years.  It was released in the year 1998 for the Nintendo 64, and was the fifth installment in The Legend of Zelda franchise.

HyruleEdit

While certain landmarks of Hyrule commonly return, Hyrule's geography appears to be laid out
Hyrule1

Hyrule Symbol

differently with almost every new game set in it. Parts of Hyrule found in one game's map may be in a different location, have different geographical features, or be completely absent in another. While some games may take into account the geography in past Zelda games (A Link to the Past and Four Sword Adventures share almost the same Hylian geography) others may completely ignore them (The Minish Cap's Hyrule bears almost no resemblance to any other game). Several fan explanations have been given. The first is that the changes occurred because of geological events between the games such as earthquakes, mudslides, erosion, forest growth, continental drift, or all of the above. The second theory is that Hyrule's geography stays relatively the same but that each new game shows the same Hyrule seen from a different angle, that landmarks are renamed, or that other unseen parts of Hyrule are seen each game. Some fans argue that while Hyrule does change from game to game it is simply due to gameplay
Hyrule2

Hyrule Map

reasons to give players something new to explore while staying in the same land and has no real in-game explanations.

It is also possible that different parts of Hyrule are shown throughout the various games. In The Legend of Zelda comics, the map from Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is added to the north of the map found in The Legend of Zelda, and the in-game map for Zelda II: The Adventure of Link also has an area that resembles a scaled down version of the map in The Legend of Zelda. The geography then allows the map from A Link to the Past to be included to the west.

Boy in the GraveyardEdit

The Boy in the Graveyard is a character from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. When Link is a child, the boy can be found playing in Kakariko Graveyard. When Link is an adult, the whereabouts of the boy are unknown. The character is depicted as a young child with red hair, carrying a stick.  


Father​Edit

"Hey! It's a Keaton Mask!! I asked my daddy to get me one, too!"
— Boy in the Graveyard

It is possible that the father of the Boy in the Graveyard is the Keaton Mask Soldier; after giving the Hyrulean Soldier Zelda's Letter, the soldier asks Link if he can stop by the Happy Mask Shop in Hyrule Castle Town and bring him a Keaton Mask for his son. If Link displays the mask to the Boy in the Graveyard, he responds by saying that he had asked his father for one. This fact and the proximity of the soldier's post to the boy's home make a compelling argument for their possible father-son relationship.

Adult Timeline FateEdit

Boy in the Graveyard

Boy in the Graveyard

Because the whereabouts of the boy during the adult timeline are unknown, fan theories have surfaced to help solve this. The most common theory seems to be that the boy becomes the Ghost Hunter in adulthood. The boy was very interested in ghosts and the paranormal, and the Ghost Hunter makes his living by collecting and selling Poes in the deserted Hyrule Castle Town. Also, the two both carry a stick and wave it in the same motion pattern. The final similarity is that the boy makes no appearance when Link is an adult, and the Ghost Hunter makes no appearance when Link is a child.  

There are several counter-arguments for this theory however. The first is that the Ghost Hunter appears old and refers to Link as "young man", while the boy seemed much younger than Link. Another counter-argument is that the boy doesn't seem to like trouble, and when Link attempts to move gravestones, the boy tells him to stop and threatens to tell Dampé. The Ghost Hunter is the opposite and desires to see the world fall into disorder. A final minor counter-argument is that the boy's mother is not accounted for in the adult section of the game. This, however, could be due to anything.

Conversely, another theory holds that the boy, his father the guard, and rest of his family abandoned Kakariko Village for parts unknown after Ganondorf came to power. As their home is remade into the Bazaar in the Adult Timeline and no mention is made of any member of his family thereafter, it is reasonable to assume that the boy's family took the opportunity to accept an offer for their house and have fled beyond the influx of citizens to Kakariko and the changed Hyrule Kingdom, because if the boy's father was the Kakariko guard to Death Mountain, all of Hyrule's guards had either been killed by Ganondorf's wrath or fled Hyrule altogether in exile when Link becomes an adult.  

Ghost HunterEdit

"Oh...you are quite an energetic young man. You're brave and handsome, too. Heh heh heh...your name is Link, isn't it. Heh heh he...don't be surprised. I can read people's minds. [...] My shop is the only Ghost Shop in Hyrule. [...] The ghosts, called Poes, are spirits of concentrated hatred that appear in the fields and graveyard. They hate the world! Young man, if you catch a Poe, I will pay a lot of money for it... Heh heh hee!"
— Ghost Hunter

The Ghost Hunter is a recurring character in the Legend of Zeldaseries. He is a mysterious figure draped in purple robes, with only a bright red dot, possibly representing an eye or a face, visible underneath his hood. In most instances, the strange demeanor of the Ghost Hunter is attributed to the fact that he may be undead.

Hyrulean SoldierEdit

In Ocarina of Time, when Link is a child, a Hyrulean Soldier who wishes there was more chaos in the world
Ghost Hunter (Ocarina of Time)

Ghost Hunter

and expresses interest in ghosts can be found inside the small guardhouse near the entrance to Hyrule Castle Town. When Link returns as an adult, the small house has become the Ghost Shop. It is possible that the soldier was killed during Ganondorf's attack on Hyrule Castle and chose to pursue his interest in spirits as a ghost himself. It could also be that he underwent some sort of transformation with the aid of Ganondorf. It should be noted that the Ghost Hunter has a picture of the Triforce on the wall behind his shop and a picture of it on his belt with the bird-like part of the Hylian crest moved up a little. Out of those theorized to be the Ghost Hunter, this man, being a Hyrulean Soldier, is the only one who would have a connection to the Triforce emblem.

Boy in the GraveyardEdit

In Ocarina of Time, there is a young boy who can be found playing in Kakariko Graveyard when Link is a child. He is seen patrolling the graves with a stick similar to that of the Ghost Hunter, in an attempt to imitate Dampéthe gravekeeper. This child is never seen when Link returns to Kakariko Village as an adult, and it is possible that he somehow becomes the Ghost Hunter and relocates to the ruins of Hyrule Castle Town.

A counter-argument to this theory is that the boy doesn't seem to like trouble, and when Link attempts to move gravestones, the boy tells him to stop and threatens to tell Dampé. The Ghost Hunter is the opposite and desires to see the world fall into disorder.

The Man Who Could See the TruthEdit

In Ocarina of Time, when Link is an adult, an old man can be found around Kakariko Village. He tells Link about a man with an eye that could "see the truth". Link eventually retrieves the Lens of Truth, a Sheikah item that allows him to see the truth, from the Bottom of the Well in the village. It is generally accepted that the unnamed character's truth-seeing eye is the Lens of Truth, but it is also possible that the bright red dot underneath the Ghost Hunter's hood represents this eye, with the Ghost Hunter being the spirit of the unnamed character, whom the old man remarks had long since died.

GaroEdit

In Majora's Mask, the Ghost Hunter bears a slight resemblance to Garo Robes, spirits of the Garo ninja who once roamed Ikana. The Ghost Hunter's robe, as well as his frequent appearances in the Ikana area and knowledge of the Garo, may suggest some connection to the Garo tribe. His behavior, however, is vastly different than that of the Garo spirits wandering the area, and his knowledge of ghosts extends well beyond the Garo—suggesting that he is not a Garo himself, nor more connected to them than to any other kind of spirit.  

NaviEdit

"I'm Navi the fairy! The Great Deku Tree asked me to be your partner from now on! Nice to meet you!"
— Navi

Navi (ナビィ Nabi?) is a character from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. A fairy, Navi serves

Navi Artwork
as Link's fairy companionthroughout the game. She is given the task to aid Link by the Great Deku Tree. Although she is initially a little frustrated with this duty and does not believe Link capable of acts of heroism, she soon becomes much fonder of him, and they become an inseparable team. At the end of the game, Navi leaves the land of Hyrule for reasons unknown.

Navi stands as a milestone in the Legend of Zelda series, as she is the first of many side-kick companion characters that would appear in later games in the series. She is also the first character in the canonical entries in the series to have voice acting, speaking words like "hey", "watch out", and "listen" whenever Link comes across anything interesting or dangerous, as well as saying "hello!" to aKokiri on her way to Link's House, and when she first meets Link. She also occasionally provides Link with the last known objective in the game for the player's convenience. Navi enables Link to Z-Target people, objects and enemies, changing her color to indicate what they are. She can then provide tips, hints, or information about the object or enemy Link is targeting, including their weaknesses. Her voice acting was provided by Kaori Mizuhashi, who would later provide the voice for Ciela, another one of Link's fairy companions from The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass.

Love InterestEdit

Though never directly stated in-game, Shigeru Miyamoto revealed in an interview conducted by Famimaga 64that Navi is jealous of Princess Zelda and has feelings for Link.[1] However, it should be noted that this interview was given while the game was still in development, and makes reference to other things that are not accurate for the final version of the game, making it possible that Navi's interest in Link was also changed.

Though non-canonical, as Navi departs in the Temple of Time in the Ocarina of Time manga adaptation, she cries out "Link... I love you!", lending further credence to the theory that Navi has romantic feelings for Link.

DepartureEdit

There are many theories as to why Navi would so abruptly leave Hyrule without any apparent explanation. One is that owing to the fact that Link is not a Kokiri, and thus was never meant to have a fairy companion in the first place, Navi had to depart once his quest had been fulfilled.

Another theory is that Navi realized that she and Link could not ever truly be together as romantic partners, and decides to leave him to escape the unavoidable rejection.

The location to which Navi departs is debated by many, but it should be noted that the same general location that Navi was seen departing in Ocarina of Time corresponds to a secret entrance to the Temple of Time found in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. It is possible that she departed through this entrance either to settle there in solitude, or move on to parts still unknown.

Connecting with manga the only hint as to why Link and Navi had been separated can be found within the final issue of the Ocarina of Time manga after Link defeats Ganondorf. An ominous quote states that "Navi can now return in peace to the forest". In the second issue for the Ocarina of Time manga, Navi is charged by the Great Deku Tree to assist Link in his quest. When Link sets out searching for Navi in the first issue of Majora's Maskmanga Link ponders, "Navi... Where are you now? I want to see you one more time". Link hopes to find Navi in the forest and stumbles upon the Skull Kid.

The Legend of Zelda:  Four Swords AdventuresEdit

It is possible that the Navi Trackers mini-game is named after Navi herself. To a further extent, it could reference Link's search for her following Ocarina of Time. Alternatively, it could be an abbreviation of "Navigator".

Super Smash Bros. BrawlEdit

A fairy that appears during one of Link's taunt animations, where it comes out and flies around him, physically resembles Navi. Additionally, in the Subspace Emissary mode, during Link's introduction, a blue fairy similar to Navi is shown fluttering around him before he obtains the Master Sword. It flies away when the Halberd appears and starts dropping Shadow Bugs. It is possible that this fairy is Navi, though it may be simply a generic fairy companion.  


Windmill​Edit

"Go around! Go around and around and around! What fun! I'm so happy! I'm a music man who loves to go around and around! Go around and around!!! I'm trying to come up with a musical theme inspired by this windmill...going around and around and around!!!"
— Guru-Guru

The Windmill, also known as ? and the Windmill Hut, is a location from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of

Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.

thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features. thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features. thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.thumb|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Windmill Artwork (Ocarina of Time) (1)
Time
. Located in Kakariko Village, it is used to draw water up from the bottom of the Well of Three Features.

The Windmill is the largest building in Kakariko Village, and as such is an easily spotted landmark. Strangely, when Link enters the Windmill, the text that appears reads "?" and not "Windmill"; this may be due to the fact that the building is connected to Dampé's Grave, which also reads "?" when Link enters it. This could also be why Link shivers and sneezes in the Windmill if left idle, like he does in Dampé's Grave. Inside the Windmill is a Piece of Heart which may be obtained after first racing Dampé when Link is an adult. After re-entering the Windmill by way of its connecting tunnel, Link can pass over to the ledge where the Piece of Heart is found by riding part of the mill wheel construction. Strangely, this Piece of Heart can also be obtained by using the Boomerang when Link is a child.

The Windmill contains an upper level; while standing on the edge of a roof of a nearby house, Link can use hisLongshot to grapple himself to a wooden post located inside a square hole high up on the front of the Windmill. The hole can only be seen briefly between the blades of the Windmill as they spin. Upon reaching the hole, Link faces a staircase leading up, as well as a good view of the entire village in between the windmill blades. Following the staircase leads only to another hole and oddly, in the daytime, a Cucco. This Cucco can be used to reach the roof and the back entrance to Impa's house, allowing Link to get a Gold Skulltula on top of the house and a Piece of Heart inside.  

Story​Edit

Inside the Windmill, Link meets Guru-Guru, who is trying to come up with a musical theme inspired by the
Windmill (Ocarina of Time)
Windmill. In the future, when talked to, Guru-Guru angrily recalls that in the past, a small child played a song for him that "messed up" the Windmill. Guru-Guru teaches Link this song, known as the "
Song of Storms". Link travels back to the past and plays it for him, causing the Windmill to speed up, draining the water from the well, and allowing Link access to the catacomb-like complex below. This event is a paradox of sorts, as Guru-Guru teaches Link the "Song of Storms" in the future, yet Link teaches Guru-Guru the song when he travels back in time. Because of this, the question of who originally composed the song remains a mystery.  


Forest TempleEdit

"I'm in the Forest Temple! The forest spirits were calling for help, so I went to check it out... But it's full of evil monsters! Help me, Link!"
— Saria

The Forest Temple (森の神殿 Mori no Shinden?) is the fourth dungeon and the first Temple in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time.

Temple GuardiansEdit

Unlike the other four temples in the game, the Forest Temple does not seem to have a recurring statue
Forest Temple (Ocarina of Time)

Forest Temple Entry

found throughout the dungeon. There is the totem pole, 
dragon, raven and snake statues within the Fire Temple,Water TempleShadow Temple and Spirit Temple, respectively. These statues could indeed represent some sort of temple guardian, but if that is true, the Forest Temple is left without any representation. Despite the lack of statues, however, Link does come across several paintings of the Poe Sisters, the temple's mini-bosses. Seeing as the Poe Sisters act as guardians of the Forest Temple in their own right, this could indeed make them the Forest Temple's complement to the other temples. There is also a massive hallway which is shaped like a gargantuan spider on the Dungeon Map, and seeing as the temple represents the forest, the deity could possibly be a spider or some kind of insect.

Not a Temple, but a MansionEdit

The Forest Temple bears close resemblance to a vast, ruined mansion. Because of this it may not actually be a temple of worship, but may have once been a home to a wealthy family that was corrupted by black magic. The Poe Sisters could very well be the ghosts of said family. Since the mansion has become overgrown with plant life it has probably been lying dormant for many years. If this theory is correct, this would explain the above point about the lack of an image of a possible deity, as the temple would not be meant to worship anything. More evidence of this is in the Portraits on the walls throughout the temple and in the room with Phantom Ganon, although this may be merely a means for the Poe Sisters to disguise themselves. The Forest Temple's name does imply however that it is used as an actual temple, at least at the time Link visits it.  

Water TempleEdit

"Link, this is a beautiful lake full of pure, clear water. At the lake bottom there is a Water Temple used to worship the water spirits. The Zoras are guardians of the temple."
— Kaepora Gaebora

The Water Temple (水の神殿 Mizu no Shinden?) is the sixthdungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of

Water Temple Artwork
Time. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.

thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake. thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake. thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of
Water Temple Artwork
Time
. The temple is where the Zora pay homage to the water spirits. The Water Temple is infamous among Zelda fans for its difficulty; however, the dungeon's difficulty level was drastically lowered for Master Questand the 3DS remake.

At the unveiling of Ocarina of Time 3D at E3 2010, series creatorShigeru Miyamoto stated that he had been haunted by guilt for the last ten years due to the negative backlash against the dungeon's difficulty. As a result, measures were taken to ensure that the Water Temple can be more easily completed in the remake. These include an easier method of switching between the Kokiri and Iron Boots as well as three colored paths leading to the locations where Link can raise or lower the temple's water level.

Temple GuardianEdit

It is possible that the serpent-like statue found all over the Water Temple symbolizes the dungeon's patron
Water Temple
deity. This statue is never mentioned, but it is seen quite often throughout the temple. Snakes can also be seen several times in the Temple's architecture, and the boss, Morpha, loosely resembles a snake. Also, all of the other adult dungeons seem to have their own representations. It is possible that these serpents are the water spirits that the Zoras use the temple to pay homage to. Interestingly, 
Lanayru, a light spirit from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess who can be found in Lake Hylia, resembles a snake, so Lanayru's design may be a subtle reference to these serpent statues if they have any significance.

Lakebed TempleEdit

Due to their similar structure, location, and main item, many believe that the Lakebed Temple from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess and the Water Temple are one and the same.  


Shadow TempleEdit

"Shadow Temple... Here is gathered Hyrule's bloody history of greed and hatred..."
— Painting

The Shadow Temple (闇の神殿 Yami no Shinden?) is the seventhdungeon from The Legend of Zelda:

Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.

thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.thumb|left|link=The Legend of Zelda:
Shadow Temple

Shadow Temple

Ocarina of Time
. Interestingly, the Shadow Temple's Japanese name, "Yami no Shinden", is the same name used for the Palace of Darkness in the Japanese localization of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.

Original PurposeEdit

One theory about the original intention of the Shadow Temple is that it was built to absorb and concentrate all the "evil" and negative feelings of Hyrule such as greed, hatred, jealousy, etc.; all of which can form a breeding ground for what will come to grow into a corrupted world. Assuming that this statement is plausible, it would mean that the Shadow Temple was in fact built for the purpose of preserving peace and calm in Hyrule, making sure it would remain a healthy and prosperous country by simply taking in all conceivable malice and negative emotions, and not to be a dark, twisted torture chamber which is easily assumed by the interiors and overall eerie feel the temple offers. Subsequently, this would mean that the Shadow Temple would have to reap the penalty of the wrongdoings of the entire world of Hyrule. Again, if plausible, this could certainly reduce the temple to nothing more than a frightening, distorted nightmare accordingly. This theory is based upon clues whispered by Skull Paintings in the Shadow Temple.

Because of the presence of many torture and execution devices, it is also believed that the Shadow Temple could have been used for human sacrifice. Why this potential sacrifice took place is however unknown, bringing doubt to this theory.

PrisonEdit

Another more likely possibility is the temple was used by the Sheikah to punish and imprison enemies of theRoyal Family of Hyrule, similar to the original purpose of the Arbiter's Grounds in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. This is due to similarities between the two dungeons as they contain many Ghosts and undead enemies, presumably the tormented souls and animated corpses of prisoners once held there. This could also explain the temples layout as a design to prevent escape, possibly even designed to contain their evil souls, to prevent them from taking revenge on the living.

Sheikah Training GroundEdit

In addition to being a temple it may have also been used a sort of Training Ground for the Sheikah similar to the Gerudo's Training Ground. The Temple's overall layout and disturbing feel would serve well to test a Shiekah's combat skills and mental fortitude.

Sheikah TempleEdit

Due to the Temple's location in Kakariko Graveyard, close proximity to Kakariko Village a former Sheikah village, the Sheikah association with shadows such as being called the "Shadows of Hyruleans" or "Shadow Folk", and Impa status as the Sage of Shadow. The Sheikah may have served as the Temple's guardians similar to the relationships between the Kokiri and the Forest Temple, the Gorons and the Fire Temple, theZoras and the Water Temple, the Gerudo and the Spirit Temple, and Hylians and the Temple of Time. The Sheikah may have used the Temple for a variety of purposes pertaining to their role as the Royal Family's protectors, such being used as a prison, as a training ground, or both. Given the Sheikah's shadowy nature it is possible they used the temple to preformed some there more questionable activities in secret away from the general civilian populous. Things such as imprisoning, interrogating, torturing, and/or executing Hyrule's enemies, including criminals, traitors, and foreign spies.

Bottom of the WellEdit

Due to their similar theme and close proximity, it is possible that the Bottom of the Well and Shadow Temple are somehow related, either serving a similar purpose and/or even as part of a Sheikah controlled prison system.

Temple GuardianEdit

It is possible that the raven-like statue found all over the Shadow Temple symbolizes the dungeon's
Shadow Temple Guardian
patron 
deity. This statue is never mentioned, but it is seen quite often throughout the temple. This raven-like being could very well be a god or goddess to the Sheikah, though neither Sheik nor Impa ever mention a patron deity of the Shadow Folk. Additionally, all of the other adult dungeons seem to have their own representations. Another fact supporting this theory is that this statue is present in the Bottom of the Well, another area that has been linked with the Sheikah.

Fourth or Fifth Temple?  Edit

There seems to be a minor contradiction in the game during indications of whether the Shadow Temple is the fourth or the fifth temple. By looking at the order of the medallions on the Quest Subscreen, it is revealed that the Spirit Temple is intended to be completed before the Shadow Temple. However, story wise, the Spirit Temple is the last major temple. The need for the Lens of Truth to cross the Haunted Wasteland and find the Spirit Temple also seems to imply that the Shadow Temple is intended to be completed before the Spirit Temple, as the Lens of Truth is acquired in the Shadow Temple section of Link's quest; however, the Hover Boots are never needed to reach or complete the Spirit Temple, only serving to remove the difficulty curve to some extent in certain puzzles of that temple. In fact, most locations within Gerudo's Fortress, the Haunted Wasteland, the Desert Colossus, and the Spirit Temple where the Hover Boots may be found useful, theLongshot can be used instead, which becomes apparent at the River of Sand in the Haunted Wasteland; however, despite this lack of use of the Hover Boots within the Spirit Temple and at related locations, the Silver Gauntlets and Mirror Shield found in the Spirit Temple provide no extra assistance within the Shadow Temple.

The Shadow Temple is generally regarded as the fourth temple because Sheik, when making her original appearance, mentions each temple in what seems to be order of completion, where the Shadow Temple is mentioned before the Spirit Temple. Also, the game's official strategy guide directs readers to complete the Shadow Temple directly after completing the Water Temple.

TwiliEdit

The strange, circular symbol imprinted on the ground near the entrance to the temple greatly resembles the Mirror of Twilight. Although seemingly unlikely, it is possible that The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess drew inspiration from this symbol. If so, this furthers the theory that the Twili are indeed Sheikah.  

Spirit TempleEdit

"Ganondorf and his minions are using the Spirit Temple as a hideout. Only the Silver Gauntlets will allow me to sneak deep into the temple. Once there, I'm going to steal all the treasure inside and mess up their plans!"
— Nabooru

The Spirit Temple (魂の神殿 Tamashī no Shinden?) is the eighthdungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. It lies within theDesert Colossus, to the west of the Haunted Wasteland.

Arbiter's Grounds in The Legend of Zelda:  Twilight PrincessEdit

While the Gerudo Desert does appear in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, the Spirit Temple is nowhere to be seen. However, the Arbiter's Grounds bear many striking similarities to the Spirit Temple both in architecture (for example, the Goddess of the Sand appears at the top of the Arbiter's Grounds and is also a prominent feature of the Spirit Temple) as well as location, and it is possible that they are the one and same.

Temple GuardianEdit

It is possible that the snake statues found all over the Spirit Temple symbolize the dungeon's patron deity. This statue is never mentioned, but it is seen quite often throughout the temple. Also, all of the other adult dungeons seem to have their own representations, which furthers this concept. It is possible that the Goddess of the Sand serves this purpose as well.

Fourth or Fifth Temple?  Edit

The Spirit Temple is widely considered to be the fifth and final temple in the game before Ganon's Castle, as evidenced by the fact that almost every guide and walkthrough, including the one published by Nintendo, list it as the fifth, and is the last mentioned by Sheik when he informs Link about the temples in which the sages are found. It is, however, speculated that it may actually be the fourth because the Spirit Medallion and the "Requiem of Spirit" are placed behind the Shadow Medallion and the "Nocturne of Shadow" respectively. Additionally, it is possible to complete the entire Spirit Temple before completing the Shadow Temple.

Another hint that it may have been originally intended as the second to last temple, is that Sheik does not inform the player that they can return to the past before the Shadow Temple, but rather, before the Spirit Temple. This knowledge should seemingly have been provided before embarking on a certain part of the quest to gain access to the Shadow Temple, in which Link must travel back in time to obtain the Lens of Truth from the Bottom of the Well. However, the Lens of Truth itself is needed to summon the guide that leads Link to the Desert Colossus in the Haunted Wasteland. This implies that the Spirit Temple is likely meant to be completed after the Shadow Temple.

It may also be intended that the Spirit Temple and the Shadow Temple can be completed in either order. This is suggested by the overworld map subscreen where both the dots pinpointing the locations of the Gerudo Valley and Kakariko Village are both flashing once the Water Temple has been completed, indicating that Link may travel to either of these locations to progress through the story.  

Soldiers of HyruleEdit

It is possible that the Knights of Hyrule trace their origins back to the Knights of Skyloft from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword as a means of protecting the citizens of Hyrule. The Hylian Shield as well as the Knight's Crest bears a bird motif, possibly representing the Loftwing, further supporting this idea.  

Keaton Mask SoldierEdit

"Hey! It's a Keaton Mask!! I asked my daddy to get me one, too!"
— Boy in the Graveyard

It is possible that the son of the Keaton Mask Soldier is the Boy in the Graveyard; After giving the Keaton Mask Soldier Zelda's Letter, he asks Link if he could stop by the Happy Mask Shop and bring him a Keaton Mask for his son. If Link displays the mask to the Boy in the Graveyard, the child responds by saying that he had asked his daddy for one. This, as well as the fact that the Boy in the Graveyard, his mother, and all the Hyrulean Soldiers (including the Keaton Mask Soldier) disappeared when Link became an adult and the close proximity of the Keaton Mask Soldier's stationing to the boy's home, makes for a compelling argument for their father-son relationship and of his apparent marriage to the boy's mother.  

Great Deku TreeEdit

"The Deku Tree is both an earth spirit and the guardian of the forest. He has lived many long years, so his wisdom is vast."
— Figurine

The Great Deku Tree is a recurring character in the Legend of Zelda series. Although the two Great Deku

Great Deku Tree Artwork (The Wind Waker)
Trees that appear are different, their purpose remains the same: to protect the spirits of the forest.  

It is speculated that the Great Deku Tree's stump appears in Twilight Princess. This stump is located to the south of the Great Bridge of Hylia in the Lanayru Province. The stump is fairly large, indicating that it may have been a Great Deku Tree. Also, note that there are ChuChus in the Forest Haven in The Wind Waker, as well asChus appearing underneath the stump in Twilight Princess. It is also speculated that the stump is the dead tree that was above the Water Temple in Ocarina of Time, but that seems unlikely since the tree in Ocarina of Timewas significantly smaller. An even more widely believed inference is that the Forest Temple of Twilight Princessis in fact the remains of the Great Deku Tree of Ocarina of Time. This can be determined from the temple's location being inside a giant tree the size of the Deku Tree, and the presence of the Kokiri symbol on the doors of the temple just as it was on the doors inside the Deku Tree in Ocarina of Time. However, this theory as flawed as the dungeon in Twilight Princess is much larger than "Inside the Deku Tree" in Ocarina of Time.

Another speculation holds that the Deku Tree's stump is located in Ordon Village. If one compares the map

Great Deku Tree (Ocarina of Time)
of Ordon to the map of Kokiri Forest, they appear to be the same area, with certain differences (which could be attributed to the passage of time between Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess). Following this map, the clearing where Link meets the Great Deku Tree in Ocarina of Time is the water-hole in the village. In the center of that hole is a protruding structure, from the bottom of the water, which could be the dried-up and crusted remains of the original Great Deku Tree. This theory, however, should be taken with a grain of salt, as the same type of structure can be seen coming from Faron Spring as well.

There is also a theory about the Great Deku Tree appearing in the original The Legend of Zelda. This theory expresses that Level 1 is a dead Deku Tree. That would suggest that there were two Deku Trees at once, as there is another tree Link could enter toward the northeastern corner of the Overworld that contains a Rupee minigame. It should be noted when considering this that two different large, sentient trees existed in the Oracle games.

Since Tingle's Rosy Rupeeland details the beginning of Tingle's story, it quite possibly takes place beforeOcarina of Time. However, since Tingle is known to have originated in Termina (see The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask), it is possible this game takes place in Termina, which would make this Deku Tree the Terminian equivalent to Hyrule's Deku Tree.

If that is not the case, and the game takes place in Hyrule, then it is possible that the Deku Tree in this game may be the father of the one in Ocarina of Time, implying that the Deku Tree's Heir seen in this game would later become the Great Deku Tree in Ocarina of Time.  

LinkEdit

"But then, when all hope had died, and the hour of doom seemed at hand... a young boy clothed in green appeared as if from nowhere. Wielding the blade of evil's bane, he sealed the dark one away and gave the land light."
— The Wind Waker Prologue

Link Artwork 1 (Twilight Princess)

Link

Link (リンク Rinku?[1][2][3][4]) is the main protagonist of theLegend of Zelda series. He is usually depicted as a courageous young boy or teenager in green clothing who leaves his home and any relatives to pursue his destiny: fighting the evil forces threatening the land. Over the course of his adventure, Link defeats legions of evil monsters, explores vasts lands, helps anyone he meets struggling, navigates deadly dungeons, and collects mythical items while pursuing his quest for justice and peace. In the end, he gains the power needed to thwart his main enemy and becomes a legendary hero. He is considered an iconic character in video gaming and the very symbol of the Zelda franchise, and remains one of the most popular video game protagonists.

ReincarnationEdit

A common theory as to why each incarnation of Link looks similar and have similar abilities is that they are reincarnations of one another. It is notable that when Demise put a curse onto the Skyward Sword Link and Zelda, he stated "Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero." which may have been referring to reincarnation. It should be noted however, that Link from The Wind Waker, the Hero of Winds, could not be the reincarnation of the Hero of Time since he went to the Child Timeline and effectively disappeared from the Adult Timeline. According to the King of Red Lions, the Hero of Winds has no connection to the Hero of Time, though it is unclear whether he is referring to blood relation or reincarnation with this statement. It is worth noting that Ganondorf believes the Hero of Winds is the Hero of Time reborn, though his claim has no concrete evidence. Link from Twilight Princess also is not the reincarnation of the Hero of Time since, according to Hyrule Historia, he not only met the Hero of Time as the Hero's Shade, but is also his descendant.

RelativesEdit

Another theory as to why each incarnation of Link looks similar to one another is that they are actually related to one another. This is supported by the fact that the Hero of Time is the ancestor of Link in Twilight Princessas well as how it is stated in A Link to the Past that the Master Sword can only be pulled out from its pedestal by the ones who carry the bloodline of the Knights of Hyrule. It is possible that when Demise stated "Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero," when he put a curse on Link and Zelda, he was actually referring to the "spirit of the hero" as a form of will or a set of personality traits rather than the soul itself. If this is the case, this could explain each Link's connection with the Triforce as well as their abilities in physical, mystical and spiritual ways.

This may mean when he was stating "Those who share the blood of the goddess" he was referring to Skyward Sword Link and Zelda's descendants as the other incarnation of Links rather than the Royal Family of Hyrule, where an alternate reason for the Royal Family having magical powers is the Light Force as hinted in The Minish Cap. This would explain why Link faces other adversaries aside from Ganon, with Zelda (or other members of the Royal Family) sometimes not being present to support the side of good in games such as asMajora's Mask and Link's Awakening. The Japanese text states that Demise's hatred and the Demon Tribe will go under an "evolution", which may mean the curse could involve other villains apart from Ganon himself.

If each Link is related to one another, they need not be related along a single line of descendants. For example, the Hero of Winds cannot be a direct descendant of the Hero of Time since the latter returned to the Child Timeline immediately after his victory over Ganon while being a young preteen in a teenager's body, but provided the Hero of Winds can trace his lineage to Skyward Sword Link, the theory still holds. It's possible that the reason why the Master Sword can only be pulled from it's pedestal by someone who carries the bloodline of the Knights of Hyrule is a sub-conscience decision by Fi, who is the spirit of the Master Sword.

MadasEdit

It is possible that in the contemporary Hylian language during the events of Skyward Sword, Link's name may be "Madas" when pronounced. This would explain why Fi, when talking to Link in dialogue that uses his name, often says "Madi Madas" with "Madi" possibly being "Master" in the language. Alternatively, it is possible that Fi's words are gibberish used repetitively in the game, similar to Midna in Twilight Princess.  

ZoraEdit

"The Zoras come from Zora's Domain in northeast Hyrule. An aquatic race, they are longtime allies of Hyrule's Royal Family. I heard that only the Royal Family of Hyrule can enter Zora's Domain..."
— Kaepora Gaebora

The Zora (ゾーラ Zōra?) are a recurring race in the Legend of Zeldaseries. Zoras are aquatic, blue-

Zora Artwork (Ocarina of Time)

Zora

skinned humanoid creatures that exist in HyruleLabrynna and Termina. They are incredibly skilled natural swimmers. The appearance of Zoras can vary greatly; some are large and round, like King Zora XVI, while others are slender and small, such as Prince Ralis. This suggests the possible existence of subspecies within the Zora race.

Indeed, Zoras are divided into two known major subspecies: theRiver Zoras, and the Sea Zoras. River Zoras are known as the hostile enemy race that pop out of the water and fire energy balls atLink; whereas the peaceful Zoras are the Sea Zoras. The two differ physically. Despite their names, both types of Zora are known to inhabit both the ocean/sea and bodies of fresh water.

Interestingly, a symbol identical to the Mark of Nayru is sometimes associated with the Zora race.

EvolutionEdit

Medli

Medli

According to Zelda director Eiji Aonuma, the Rito are the evolved form of the Zora. This half-bird, half-human race makes multiple references to the Zora, which further confirms this evolution. The most convincing is the fact that Medli shares the bloodline of the Zora Earth Sage Laruto, just like how Makar is a Korok, a descendant of the Kokiri like Fado. Also, the symbol of the Zora's Sapphire, which is used as the Zora's royal family symbol, can be seen in multiple places on the Ritos' home of Dragon Roost Isle. It is also on the clothes worn by some Ritos. Also, in their general physiology, Zoras and Ritos have many similarities. For example, the Rito have wings that hang down at their elbows, and the Zoras have fins at the same place.

It is unknown why this change would have occurred, since the Zoras in Oracle of Ages have been shown to be able to live in the sea off the coast of the island ofLabrynna. However, unlike the Great Sea, the Zoras seemed to be living in a controlled environment without interruption from other sea dwellers. As seen in Majora's Mask, the Zora have trouble living in water that is murky or not at optimal temperature, thus suggesting that the change in water conditions might have forced them to evolve. Also, as the Great Sea is quoted as being mainly devoid of fish to catch, it is possible that the Zoras' main food source dried up, forcing them to become land creatures. As the Great Sea is filled with numerous monsters and other dangerous marine life forms, the Zora might have been forced to evolve in order to avoid being eaten or, at least, constantly attacked. This would explain why they now had to fly over the water, rather than swim through it. A small rumor states that the goddesses did not want anyone to find Hyrule hidden beneath the Great Sea, and as Zoras would have found the land quite quickly, the goddesses evolved the Zora on their own. However, because of the appearance of Fishmen, who are also sentient beings that live in water, this appears to be untrue.

River ZoraEdit

It should be noted that all instances of River Zora appearing within the games occur within the "Hyrule's Decline" branch of the official timeline with the exception of The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, while only the peaceful, humanoid Zora appear in the other branches, as well as before the timeline split. As such, it is possible that the existence of the River Zora was a result of Ganondorf's influence upon Hyrule following the defeat of the Hero of Time, or else a change forced upon the Zora by Agahnim, prior to the events of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, similarly to the Hyrule Guards.  

GerudoEdit

"A kid like you may not know this, but the Gerudo race consists only of women. Only one man is born every hundred years..."
— Nabooru

The Gerudo[1] are a recurring race in the The Legend of Zeldaseries. They are a reclusive tribe of thieves that consists entirely of women; however, every hundred years, a man who is destined to be their king is born. This has seemingly changed at some time though, at least in the Child Timeline. They have dark tanned skin, golden eyes and red hair. Gerudo warriors frequently wield glaive-like weapons and scimitars. It is rumored they sometimes have relations with Hylian men.

FateEdit

The Gerudo are nowhere to be found in Twilight Princess, with the exception of Ganondorf himself,
Gerudo Artwork (Ocarina of Time)

Gerudo

yet evidence that they once existed is plentiful. Their name lives on in the name of the Gerudo Desert where they lived, and a set of ruins near the entrance to the Gerudo Desert appear to have once been a structure built by human hands. These ruins are right about where the Gerudo's Fortress should have been and appear to have been destroyed by invasion, time, or both. The Arbiter's Grounds, themselves theorized to be the Spirit Temple, bear many striking similarities to the Spirit Temple and are in a similar geographical location. Exactly what happened to the Gerudo is unknown, but certain clues given in the game can lead one to deduce what possibly happened.

The Ancient Sages appear in the Mirror Chamber atop the Arbiter's Grounds after the defeat of Stallord, and reveal to Link that Ganondorf and his followers attempted to establish dominion over the Sacred Realm, but failed. Ganondorf was captured and sentenced to death; however, the Ancient Sages merely managed to wound Ganondorf, who managed to kill the Sage of Water in retaliation. Left with no other choice, they used the Mirror of Twilight to seal him away in the Twilight Realm. With their insurrection having failed and their leader gone, it is possible that the Gerudo grew to be hated by the other denizens of Hyrule; as a result, they could have been targets of an attack by Hylian military forces and driven out of Hyrule outright, accounting for the ruins of what is ostensibly their fortress. They also may have been banished into the Twilight Realm through the Mirror of Twilight, as is done with certain criminals, or imprisoned within the Arbiter's Grounds.

If the Gerudo were extirpated from the desert, either through an invasion or banishment to the Twilight Realm, the other Hyruleans could have claimed the Gerudo's revered Spirit Temple, renamed it the Arbiter's Grounds, and used it as a prison and to house the Mirror of Twilight. The time between Ganondorf's and the Gerudo's betrayal and Ganondorf's execution is all the time the other Hyruleans would have had to convert the Spirit Temple into the Arbiter's Grounds, given the that the Arbiter's Grounds were shown to be completed by the time of Ganondorf's execution. The Arbiter's Grounds themselves are filled with Poes and ReDeads, presumed to be spirits of former inmates, possibly former members of the Gerudo race if they were held there.

The timeline presented in the Hyrule Historia places Four Swords Adventures, in which the Gerudo are still present in Hyrule, after the events of Twilight Princess. In this timeline, this theory would have to be false, or else some Gerudo would have had to remain and repopulate Hyrule later, or another population entirely such as the one in Termina would have had to immigrate. Although, it is entirely possible that the Gerudo tribe lived out far enough in the desert in Twilight Princess so that they wouldn't make an appearance.

EvolutionEdit

One possibility is that, after their betrayal under Ganondorf's rule, the Gerudo were banished to the Twilight Realm by the other Hyruleans, thereafter evolving into the Twili. This theory is supported by the fact that the Mirror of Twilight, the gateway to the Twilight Realm, is found in the Gerudo Desert. Midna's dialogue before stabbing Zant, regarding how their people lost their king to greed, may be a reference to Ganondorf.

The Gerudo symbol can also be seen on Zant's throne and cloak, even before he submitted himself to Ganondorf. Also, Midna has red hair, just like the Gerudo, though it is unknown whether red is a typical Twili hair color or not. Lastly, since the gender of most of the Twili is unknown, they may all be female except for Zant. This may explain why Zant felt he deserved to be king; a single Gerudo male is born every one hundred years and made the leader of the Gerudo, and Zant would have been born approximately one hundred years after Ganondorf. However, it is just as likely that not all the other Twili are female.

Further evidence against this theory includes that the invasion of the Interlopers, the ancestors of the Twili, was said to have happened during the Hyrulean Civil War, which was over for a number of years prior to Ganondorf's invasion of Hyrule Castle. Furthermore, Ganondorf does not speak of the Twili as if they are his people but seems to imply they were already in the Twilight realm before he was banished there.

Additionally, the Gerudo would have no way to reproduce on their own while isolated from the rest of the world. They would require another population of humans alongside them to provide males, as they do with Hylians under normal circumstances. While this makes it unlikely that the Gerudo who followed Ganondorf in his attack on Hyrule are the Interlopers who started the Twili race, this does not preclude the possibility that those Gerudo were banished to the Twilight realm and intermingled with the existing Twili. This could explain the presence of the Gerudo symbol in the Twilight Realm later on during the events of Twilight Princess. The part written above about the Hyrule Historia disproves most of this theory though.

AncestorEdit

Groose has red hair and amber eyes, similar to the Gerudo. It is possible that he is the ancestor of the tribe.  

SheikahEdit

"Have you heard the legend of the "Shadow Folk"? They are the Sheikah...the shadows of the Hylians. They say they swore allegiance to the King of Hyrule and guarded the Royal Family..."
— Shikashi

The Sheikah (シーカー族 Shīkā zoku?[5]), also known as theShadow Folk, are a recurring race in

Impa Artwork (Ocarina of Time)

Sheikah

the Legend of Zelda series. The Sheikah are an ancient clan of ninja-like warriors sworn to protect the Royal Family of Hyrule, even after death; as such they came to be known as "the Shadows of the Hylians". They were skilled in magical and combative art. It is assumed that many died during the Hyrulean Civil War and are considered almost extinct by the events of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. They do however, still exist in the Fallen Hero Timeline.

While three known Sheikah appear in the games, to maintain the mystery of the race, their emblem makes many small appearances in various games in the series.

The plural for Sheikah is debated—early in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of TimeSheik and Impa both refer to themselves as being of the Sheikahs. However, the grave in Kakariko Village states that the plural of Sheikah is simply Sheikah. It is not known if this is a translation error, or if there are different Sheikah tribes or ranks. Sheikah has become largely the officially accepted plural of the race.  

The theories below are about characters, itemssongs, races and places from The Legend of Zelda series, that can be associated or directly related to the Sheikah. These theories include suggestions such as possible Sheikah in games before Ocarina of Time, evolution of the Shadow Folk in later installments (like The Wind Waker & Twilight Princess), and also speculates on some elements of the game itself.

Earlier GamesEdit

The Sheikah are first introduced in Ocarina of Time, but in The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II: The

Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.

thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family. thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family. thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.thumb|link=Zelda II: The
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)
Adventure of Link
, there is a character called Impa, who is the attendant of Princess Zelda. There are no indications that this Impa is of the Sheikah race, owing to the fact that she does not have red eyes in the game's official artwork. This could be a case of retcon byNintendo, because there are certain similarities between Impa fromOcarina of Time and the one appearing in The Legend of Zelda andAdventure of Link. They both have considerable knowledge of Hyrule, Ganon and the Royal Family.

Alternatively, according to the Legend of Zelda timeline, the events of The Legend of Zelda and its sequel Zelda II: The Adventure of Link from the NES games, take place after the time line splits into three branches based upon the outcome of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. If the Hero is defeated in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time then the next games in the time line are The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the PastThe Legend of Zelda: The Oracle of AgesThe Legend of Zelda: The Oracle of SeasonsThe Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening, then Zelda I and Zelda II. This could mean since the original NES games are the last in the game series' "defeated hero" time line, then the characteristic features of the Sheikah race of the red eyes and tanned skin, may have been lost over time by interbreeding with other races. It is already known that the characters of Zelda, Link, Impa, and others are not the same ones in all the games throughout the series. The Link in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask are the same in those two games, but it is not the same Link as the Link who appears in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker andThe Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, those each being the same Link in those two games, but at a much later time period (and a different/parallel timeline to the one cited above). As a result, the Impa that appears in the NES games, may not be a pure blooded Sheikah and therefore, possesses characteristics of both the Hylian race and the Sheikah race. As a result of her being a descendant of the Sheikah though, she still possesses the knowledge and training of the Sheikah people. We already know the Sheikah were a rare race inThe Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and naturally became even fewer over the period of time that followed. If the Sheikah and Hylian's were originally the same race that differed over time after a split between them occurred, it would be only natural for those characteristics distinguishing one from the other to merge and blend if they were joined back together at a later time.

In The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, there is a wizard of unknown origin that comes to Hyrule to free it from the misfortunes; this dark magic practitioner is known as Agahnim. He is represented with an eye symbol on his robes, in the official game artwork; this emblem can also be seen in the floor just before Links breaks the energy barrier with the Master Sword in Hyrule Castle and in the final room just before meeting Agahnim inGanon's Tower. The possibility also comes up because Agahnim was really close to the Royal Family. On a side-note, Agahnim shares some features associated with the Zuna tribe, a race which boasts several parallels to the Sheikah.

Interloper/Twili TheoryEdit

Some fans theorize that the Twili race of Twilight Princess are connected to the Sheikah, as both are practitioners of dark magic and the tribal symbol of both races are similar. Some even go as far to say that the Sheikah are the Interlopers from whom the Twili are descended, as, being so close to the Royal Family, they would know much of the Triforce. Both the Interlopers and the Twili have red eyes as the Shadow Folk. The Sheikah symbol found on the Fused Shadow and the one in Zant's Throne, is regarded as a clue of this supposed relation.

It is also notable to consider the possibility that a faction of the Sheikah tribe broke away and became the Interlopers while a faithful few (Impa amongst them) remained loyal to the Royal Family of Hyrule. This is supported by the manga of Ocarina of Time, when Sheik explains the story of the Sheikah emblem, stating that there was one instance of betrayal from the Royal Family toward the Sheikah, and they were banished out of Hyrule, so the tear was added on the Shadow Folk emblem to commemorate this event. Making an even stronger case for this theory, the symbols on the Fused Shadow (an item used during the Hyrulean Civil War by the Interlopers) and on Zant's Throne (the seat of the ruler of the Twilight Realm) are similar to the Sheikah emblem but lacking of the characteristic tear. Even more feasible the Fused Shadow was created during or prior to the Hyrulean Civil War, before the addition of the emblematic tear. All of this strongly maintains the theory that the Interlopers, or the Twili are the Sheikah that were banished to the Twilight Realm.

Also, in the game, the Twili are often referred to as "shadow" creatures, similar to "Shadow Folk". Almost everything in the series with the word "shadow" in the name is attributed or theorized to be related to the Twili or the Sheikah, so logically, there may be a connection between the two races.

Ocarina of Time/Majora's Mask, People and PlacesEdit

This section is about the villagers and places from Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, that are implied to be Sheikah or have a connection with the tribe:

The Man Who Could See the Truth/Bango BangoEdit

Bongo Bongo, the boss in the Shadow Temple is theorized to be (or have been) a Sheikah. From Shikashi(whose name bears a striking resemblance to the word Sheikah) in Kakariko Village, Link learns the story of theMan Who Could See the Truth with his one and only eye. This man once lived where Kakariko Well stands in Link's present time.

It is possible that Bongo Bongo, the one-eyed boss of the Shadow Temple is a shapeshifter and the one-eyed man is in truth Bongo Bongo. The Lens of Truth (used against the shadow boss) and Mask of Truth are closely related to this mysterious man. The boss description seen before Bongo Bongo attacks Link refers to Bongo Bongo as a "Phantom Shadow Beast" - "Phantom" indicates the ghost of a deceased person and "Shadow" could be associated with the Shadow Folk. This man was supposedly an Interloper during the Hyrulean Civil War who was executed for his alignment in the conflict.

Another supposed theory is that he was a Twili that wasn't imprisoned in the Twilight Realm. Instead, he was sealed away in the Bottom of the Well by Impa. It is also possible that before they knew about the Mirror of Twilight they bound certain Interlopers in distinct places.

Bongo Bongo, isn't the only one theorized as the "one eyed man who sees the truth"; there is also the cloakedGhost Hunter from the Ghost Shop, who claims to read people's minds (ability of the Mask of Truth). The one part of his face seen is a bright red dot, supposedly an eye. See also Vaati's theory below.

Shadow TempleEdit

The place where Bongo Bongo resides when Link is an adult is the "Shadow" Temple (as "Shadow" Folk), also known as the House of the Dead. This dungeon has been theorized to be another Sheikah location. The door to the temple bears something similar to the ever-present Sheikah symbol, perhaps indicating that the temple was once a haven for the outcast race or something in that direction.

Composer BrothersEdit

Sharp, one of the Composer Brothers found in Kakariko Graveyard, states that he and his brother were originally from Kakariko Village, and all inhabitants from the village had to serve the Royal Family, and were assigned to study the mystic power of the family. The Brothers (as well as the early villagers) were possibly members of the Sheikah tribe because they are the only race known to have served the Royal Family. The "Sun's Song" is also questioned to be a Sheikah song (along with the "Nocturne of Shadow"), because it was composed by the brothers.

Fabulously Rich FamilyEdit

The Fabulously Rich Family consists of five teenagers and their father who are victims of the Gold Skulltulacurse. They live in Kakariko Village in the House of Skulltula, a house with spider webs and eroded bricks, reputedly one of the oldest houses in the village. According to a villager they were a rich family who were cursed because of their greed. When Link finds the 100 Gold Skulltula Tokens, the family who were once spider-like beings are transformed back to their human forms, and they all share the same characteristics: long pointed ears and red hair. However, their eyes are closed, so it is not possible to determine whether they have the red eyes of the Sheikah. It should be noted that before the Fabulously Rich Family is transformed back, they have blue eyes. It is unknown if this is simply from the curse, or if they indeed have blue eyes.

Happy Mask SalsemanEdit

The Happy Mask Salesman who appears in both Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask is one of the characters most frequently associated with the race and is a likely descendant of the Sheikah. Whenever the Salesman is angered, his eyes can be clearly seen to be blood red, however, this may be due to the fact that his eyes are bloodshot due to the anger and frustration. The Salesman can also appear and disappear without notice. Other possible connections with the Sheikah are his possession of the Mask of Truth, a mask passed down by the Shadow Folk, and his physical similarities with the Fabulously Rich Family.

Kafei and Madame AromaEdit

Kafei, from Majora's Mask has red eyes and pointed ears, although this could only be a temporary transformation by Majora, he also could have got the pigmentation by heredity. His father, Mayor Dotour, has the particular purple hair but black eyes; this characteristic probably came from his mother, Madame Aroma, who is red-haired, has long and pointed ears and eyes too closed to see their color, making another possible connection to the Fabulously Rich Family and the Sheikah tribe.

VaatiEdit

The sorcerer Vaati is a recurring villain of the Four Swords subseries. This character, although he is of

Vaati Hylian Form (The Minish Cap)
the Minish race, has the red eyes and pointed ears of the Sheikah. Also, in most of his "monster" forms he assumes the appearance of an enormous eye. In the The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap, his penultimate transformation (Vaati Transfigured) has the eye and the three triangles/eyelashes, resembling the Sheikah symbol.

Under the assumption that the Four Swords subseries is set after Ocarina of Time in the official The Legend of Zelda chronology, it is possible that when Vaati wished to be "the most powerful sorcerer in the world" he adopted the form of a great Sheikah (possibly Bongo Bongo), explaining the "Vaati posters" in Kakariko's Shooting Gallery inOcarina of Time. The lack of credibility of the theory comes from the fact Vaati has red eyes in his Minish form. There is a possibility that the Wind Mage could be the reincarnation of an ancient Sheikah, due the fact that no other known Minish have red eyes. In the theories that place Four Swords subseries as the earliest games in the chronology, it is possible that Vaati could be the Man Who Could See the Truth or the proverbial Adam of the Sheikah tribe.  

KokiriEdit

"The children of the forest, the Kokiri, live here with me. Each Kokiri has his or her own guardian fairy. However, there is one boy who does not have a fairy..." — Great Deku Tree

Know-It-All Brother Artwork

Know-It-All Brother

The Kokiri (コキリ Kokiri?) are a recurring race from the Legend of Zelda series. They are a cautious, child-like and secretive race native to Kokiri Forest. The Kokiri believe that they will die if they leave Kokiri Forest, and therefore, they usually never leave the safe haven and know nothing about the outside world; however, during the ending of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, it is revealed that the Kokiri can indeed travel beyond the forest limits, as some of them left their homes to do so. Some characters in other parts of Hyrule identify Link as a "fairy boy" from the forest, indicating that the outside world is aware of Kokiri even though they remain in the forest. In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, the Kokiri are revealed to have evolved into Koroks, a race of friendly, diminutive tree-beings.

The guardian of the Kokiri is the Great Deku Tree, and their self-appointed "boss" is Mido. All Kokiri are ageless, and while they appear as Hylian children, most have existed for centuries prior to the events of Ocarina of Time. Each Kokiri has a guardian fairy that functions as a friend, parent and teacher. The Kokiri are known as "the spirits of the forest" and were possibly created by the Great Deku Tree, although according to the official Nintendo strategy guide, they were originally Hylian children that wandered into Kokiri Forest and were transformed by the mystical powers of the region. They are well-known for their distinctive and traditional green garb.

The symbol used to represent the Kokiri is reminiscent of the shape of the Kokiri's Emerald,
Kokiri Female Artwork
the Spiritual Stone of Forest. This symbol is found on the Deku Shield and as engravings inside the Forest Temple.

InspirationEdit

It is possible that the green-clad Twin Lumberjacks from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past inspired the race. This is likely due to the fact that the Japanese word for "lumberjack" is pronounced "Kikori." This, combined with their proximity to the Lost Woods and the overall appearance of the Lumberjacks highly resembling the Kokiri, supports this possibility. It might also be possible that their name is driven from "Ko" meaning child or children in Japanese, and "Kiri" a flowering tree species native to Asia.

It has also been noted that Shigeru Miyamoto is a fan of Walt Disney. It's possible he based the Kokiri off of the children that reside in Neverland in the story "Peter Pan." Given the fact that the children in Neverland do not die or grow up, nor do the Kokiri children. This could also explain why Link has a similar appearance to that of Peter Pan, dressed in green.

EvolutionEdit

In Faron Woods in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, monkeys aid Link inside the Forest Temple, which is implied to be their natural habitat. A Female Monkey guides Link on his journey to the Sacred Grove (much like Saria in Ocarina of Time). Also, the Kokiri symbol appears to be tattooed on the monkeys' shoulders. These observations suggest the monkeys are actually transformed Kokiri, who, either by evolution or some other form of change, needed to better adapt to their environment. Some think that the Kokiri changed into the monkeys because the unintentional alliance with the Hylians ended when Link was sent back in time by Princess Zelda at the end of Ocarina of Time. However, the absence of the Kokiri in Twilight Princess could also be because they moved deeper into the forest after the Humans founded Ordon Village, which bears a strong resemblance to the original Kokiri Forest village.

Kokiri Male Artwork
It could also be said that the Kokiri aren't actually humanoids at all and are actually magically transformed plants. This is supported by the fact that the Great Deku Tree created them, which could mean that they are born from his seeds. The Koroks are very tree-like in appearance, and could very well be the Kokiri's true form.

AgingEdit

The Kokiri believe that if they leave the forest they will die. However, as it is shown during the end credits that they can in fact leave without dying, it is possible that they misunderstood and instead of dying immediately upon leaving, they would instead start aging and eventually die of old age. This is further supported by the fact that Link's appearance (and by extension the Kokiri's) is based on Peter Pan, who along with the other children, do not age unless they leave Neverland. This could also explain why no Kokiri are seen or even mentioned in Twilight Princess, as they could have grown up and started living among the Hylians. However, it is also entirely possible that this mistaken belief was due to the fact that they were under the Great Deku Tree's protection, and if they left the forest they would be vulnerable to danger.

Kakariko VillageEdit

Some notice that Windfall Island seems to be related to Kakariko Village. It is possible that
Kakariko Village (Ocarina of Time)
Windfall Island is Kakariko Village; this can be supported geologically, as Kakariko Village was located on a high hill. Dragon Roost Island, which is near Windfall, could relate to Death Mountain, and Kakariko Village was near Death Mountain, making Windfall Island a possible relocation site of citizens who escaped the Great Flood. They also have a few shared notes in their background music. It is also noteworthy that a shared feature of Kakariko and Windfall is the similarities between the Windmill and the wind-powered Ferris Wheel.

VolvagiaEdit

"A long time ago there was an evil dragon named Volvagia living in this mountain. That dragon was very scary! He ate Gorons! Using a huge hammer, the hero of the Gorons... BOOOM! Destroyed it just like that. This is a myth from long ago, but it's true! I know, because my dad is a descendant of the hero!" — Link of the Gorons

Volvagia Artwork

Volvagia

Subterranean Lava Dragon: Volvagia (灼熱穴居竜ヴァルバジア Shakunetsu Kekkyoryū Varubajia?, Scorching Hot Cave Dwelling Dragon: Volvagia) is the boss of the Fire Temple, the second dungeon in the adult portion of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, and the fifth dungeon overall. Volvagia is a monstrous dragon and was a blight upon Hyrule, specifically Death Mountain, for many years prior to the events of the game. He flies through the air in a blaze of fire and dives through pools of molten lava, unharmed despite their intense heat. Volvagia is infamous among the Gorons for devouring their kind alive, but was eventually defeated and slain by the Hero of the Gorons, who wielded the Megaton Hammer.

Zelda II: The Adventures of LinkEdit

Volvagia bears a striking resemblance to Barba, a dragon boss in The Adventure of Link, not only in appearance but in name, as well. Their names are identical in Japanese, and the name Barba is, in fact, re-translated into Volvagia in the re-release of The Adventure of Link on the Game Boy Advance as well as in The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition strategy guide.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind WakerEdit

Many fans believe that Dragon Roost Island from The Wind Waker is Death Mountain post-Great
Dragon Roost Cavern Mural
Flood. This theory is furthered by particular carvings within Dragon Roost Cavern. The Cavern bears a striking resemblance to the Fire Temple, and many carvings found throughout the dungeon depict a snake-like dragon resembling Volvagia.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight PrincessEdit

Some fans believe that Stallord, the boss of the Arbiter's Grounds, is Volvagia's skeleton. The most notable similarity between the two is their similarly shaped skulls. Additionally, a remixed version of Volvagia's boss music plays during the second phase of the fight against Stallord. Stallord, however, is much larger than Volvagia, and Volvagia is defeated on Death Mountain, while Stallord is found in Gerudo Desert, making this theory unlikely; these two creatures may be of the same species, however. Additionally, Volvagia has three fingers on each hand, while Stallord has five fingers on each hand.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward SwordEdit

The boss chamber of the Earth Temple features a massive skeleton that greatly resembles Volvagia, and there is a prevalence of statues and carvings of Volvagia-esque dragons, possibly indicating the presence of Volvagia or its ancestors within the Eldin Volcano. The skeleton may in fact be hinted to be the remains of Volvagia, which is revived during the events of Ocarina of Time. This may be contradicted however, by a lack of Goron society within Eldin Volcano, making it more likely that this is an ancestor of Volvagia, rather than Volvagia itself.

Super MetroidEdit

Volvagia bears striking resemblance to the boss Botwoon. Like Volvagia, Botwoon is a large,
Smart botwoon

Botwoon

red, serpentine creature. It swims about the room, entering and exiting holes scattered about, sometimes poking its head out of a hole to spit toxic spores at Samus. Like Volvagia, Botwoon's weak spot is its head, and once it is defeated, chunks of its body fall to the floor and explode in similar fashion to the Volvagia battle. Due to these similarities, it is possible that Volvagia was inspired by Botwoon.

Bongo BongoEdit

Bongo Bongo is theorized to be (or have been) a Sheikah. This is because when Adult Link talks
Bongo Bongo Artwork

Bongo Bongo

to Shikashi near the House of Skulltula, the elderly man states:

"A long time ago... There was a man in this very village who had an eye they said could see the truth! Now usually, you have to train your mind's eye most strenuously to actually see the truth... But this fella, no, they say he had a different way of doing things... His house stood where the well is now..." — Shikashi The shapeshifting monster could be the Man Who Could See the Truth due to the fact that Bongo Bongo has one eye and was living in the well. His house could have been sent to the bottom of the well, along with certain artifacts (the Lens of Truth, a Sheikah item). Bongo Bongo's description says Phantom Shadow Beast, with "phantom" possibly meaning "deceased person" and "shadow" potentially alluding to "Shadow folk", another name for the Sheikah. However, the "eye" he references could have been a metaphor, and a direct reference to the Lens itself.

Also, it is possible that Bongo Bongo betrayed the Royal Family of Hyrule in the Hyrulean Civil War and was executed, being sent (along with his house) to the bottom of the Kakariko Well. To add to this theory, The Bottom of the Well has various torturing devices, which means this could have been the place that Bongo Bongo was executed in, which could explain his appearance, possibly due to having his hands cut off and the blood drained from his body. The condition of his neck could also be akin to a wound from a crude decapitation. Another theory proposed is that it was an Interloper, but it was not imprisoned in the Twilight Realm. Instead it was sealed away in the Bottom of the Well by Impa. It is also possible that before they knew about the Mirror of Twilight they bound certain interlopers in distinct places. The name 'Shadow Beast' is also used for some Interlopers, which may imply that Bongo Bongo is a phantom version of an Interloper or is connected to them in some way.

It is also possible Bongo Bongo was created by Ganondorf after he became the King of Evil, since Sheik never mentions when Impa sealed it in the well, and the entrance to the Bottom of the Well is sealed off as an adult at all times. Also, he is never seen in the well while Link is a child, though the well's state at this time may imply the presence of a malevolent spirit.

Skull Kid(Race)Edit

Skull Kids slightly resemble Imp Poes, with their small shape, mischievously violent nature,
Skull Kid Artwork (Ocarina of Time)

Skull Kid(Race)

and (in Twilight Princess) lanterns. This could mean that Skull Kids are Imp Poes' living counterparts. Interestingly, the Happy Mask Salesman and number of other characters refer to the Skull Kid from Majora's Mask as an imp. Of course this could be simply because of his small stature.

Skull Kid(Character)Edit

It is widely believed—and heavily implied in Majora's Mask—that the Skull Kids in Ocarina of
Art1

Skull Kid(Character)

Time and Majora's Mask are one and the same. While no outright statement is ever made regarding this, it seems beyond a reasonable doubt this is what the games' creators intended.

Firstly, upon encountering Link in the Lost Woods after having ambushed him, the Skull Kid appears to recognize Link, but deems it not to be a problem. Later, after the Skull Kid is removed from the influence of Majora's Mask, he tells Link that he smells the same as "that fairy kid who taught [him] that song in the woods": in Ocarina of Time, Link plays "Saria's Song" to a Skull Kid in the Lost Woods, who becomes his friend after this.

Additionally, Link sells the Skull Mask to this same Skull Kid, indicating a preexisting interest for masks which could have motivated the Skull Kid's theft of Majora's Mask. Lastly, after the end credits of Majora's Mask, the final image shown is a stump bearing carvings of the Skull Kid, Link, Tatl, Tael, and the Four Giants. After a certain amount of time passes, part of "Saria's Song" will play.

It is also possible that this Skull Kid is either the same Skull Kid, or an ancestor to the Skull Kid from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. This is supported by the fact that that Skull Kid knows "Saria's Song".

Dodongo's CavernEdit

Oddly enough, Dodongo's Cavern may be known to the Gorons of Termina, as one Goron in the Mountain Village describes the food Goron Link gives him as "Dodongo Cavern's finest quality Rock Sirloin!" Whether this refers to Hyrule's Dodongo Cavern or an unseen parallel location in Termina is unknown.

The Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time/Majora Mask Theory - Link is DeadEdit

There is a popular theory regarding The Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, which states that the Link from Ocarina of Time is not in fact the same Link as in Majora's Mask, and that he is in fact dead; this link supposedly became a Skull Child, and is the Skull Child constantly tormenting the Link in Majora's Mask. This theory is further supported by the fact that Link constantly traveled through the Lost Woods, and children who get lost in the Lost Woods become Skull Children if they're not the Kokiri, which Link is not, he's a Hylian. Another theory is that he was killed when he was thrown off his horse, Epona, at the beginning of the game.

Gerudo ValleyEdit

Although it is never confirmed, it is possible that the Gerudo Desert in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is the same as Gerudo Valley or the Haunted Wasteland from Ocarina of Time. This is likely because of how similar the location, environment, landmarks and inhabitants of the locations are.

Haunted WastelandEdit

Although it is never confirmed, it is possible that the Gerudo Desert in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is the same as Gerudo Valley or the Haunted Wasteland from Ocarina of Time. This is likely because of how similar the location, environment, landmarks and inhabitants of the locations are.

Happy Mask SalesmanEdit

"I own the Happy Mask Shop. I travel far and wide in search of masks..." — Happy Mask Salesman

The Happy Mask Salesman (お面屋 Omen'ya?, "Mask Shop Owner") is a recurring character in the
Happy Mask Salesman Artwork (Majora's Mask)

Happy Mask Salesman

Legend of Zelda series. He is a traveling collector and seller of strange, rare, and unusual masks. He is often considered one of the most unnerving characters in the series, due to his erratic behavior, unpredictable temper, strange powers, and occasional displays of hysteric outbursts. Partly due to his unique and mysterious demeanor, there are many theories as to the Happy Mask Salesman's true identity and motives; in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, he gives Link many subtle hints that he may be more than a common collector of masks.

MotivesEdit

The Happy Mask Salesman appears to be more than a simple salesman. He seems to know all about
Happy Mask Salesman's Piano
Link and his accomplishments in Hyrule and can tell what Link went through to obtain a particular mask or the power inherent in the mask, without ever seemingly leaving his post in the cave beneath Clock Town's clock tower. This is not his only strange characteristic - he also seems to appear as if from nowhere, appears to change from one pose to another instantly, and has been seen vanishing into thin air. He also manages to make a giant exaggerated piano appear from out of nowhere to teach Link the "Song of Healing". After Link learns the song, it disappears. Also, if three days pass and Termina is destroyed, Link appears back under the clock tower where the Salesman waits. Though this could also be interpreted as the game resetting to the moment before the dawn of the first day, the Salesman's laugh is heard just prior to the reset, accompanied by dialogue he had spoken previously, suggesting the Salesman may have transported Link back through time.

He also exhibits a flaring temper - he shakes Link violently from the neck when Link returns without Majora's Mask, and he has hysteric, unnerving fits. He seems to be largely benevolent during the course of the game, seems genuinely worried over the damage the Mask could wreak, and seems satisfied when he discovers that Majora's spirit has been driven from the mask. However, his motives are never explored. Furthermore, he seems to have willingly freed Majora's Mask, which shows questionable morals. His knowledge of the mask and his efforts to uncover it imply he was not worried by the threat it posed, and he seems only to have become concerned after he beheld the accursed object. It is never clear what he plans to do to the mask (or whether he has already tried to do anything). It is implied that the mask gets the Skull Kid to steal it, which indicates it was in some way restrained or unfulfilled under the possession of the Happy Mask Salesman.

However, in the non-canonical Majora's Mask manga, he displays a new more sinister side of himself (see above).

Ancient OneEdit

It is possible the Mask Salesman is an Ancient One, or descendant thereof, himself. Although he says the tribe itself has disappeared, this could only refer to the original members, and not include any offspring they subsequently had. The strongest evidence for this theory is his unusual knowledge of the tribe's history and actions. Also, his means of trapping evil magic and troubled spirits within masks through the song of healing is quite feasibly something the Ancient Ones used to effect the spirit of Majora's confinement within the mask. He has unusual and powerful magical abilities (teleportation, apparition of the piano). The Ancient Ones are already described as magic users, and their sealing of a vastly powerful mask within shadow indicates a similarly unusual and powerful magic.

He says that since the tribe disappeared, no one knows the power of the mask; however, he also claims he can feel its power--a trait possibly inherited from those who knew its power. His strong desire to acquire and then to regain the mask could be connected to an inherited sense of responsibility, or the fact that only an Ancient One's descendant could have the knowledge to control it. This may be reinforced by the masks own desire to escape from him using the Skull Kids actions. The final hint is that the field Majora created in the moon had five Lunar Children, who all resembled the Happy Mask Salesman himself. If the Mask Salesman's race and ancestors were the original wearers of the mask, it could explain why Majora chose people in that image to wear the five masks.

This is further supported by the fact that when link returns in Majora's mask without retrieving the mask, the salesman will say, "What have you done to me!" This may mean that he has some form of personal connection with the mask. Such as being the only descendant of the ancient ones and there for, the only living being capable of handling the mask.

DeityEdit

The Happy Mask Salesman's mystical powers and vast amount of knowledge could denote that the Happy Mask Salesman is not a Hylian, but rather, a Deity or the earthly avatar of one, or in the very least a higher being not of Terminan or Hyrulean soil. The Salesman can, as previously noted, make items, as well as himself appear and disappear at will. These attributes combined with the aforementioned facts makes a case for the Happy Mask Salesman in truth being a god, perhaps one who guides those who are lost.

He also may have limited control over the flow of time, as when Link is inside the Clock Tower, time does not pass; in fact, the in-game clock disappears entirely. This could be taken further to suggest that the Happy Mask Salesman is, in fact a personification of the Goddess of Time, which is further supported by the fact that Link is taken back to his meeting with the Mask Salesman if he fails to stop the Moon. If that is true then he may be the same character in Oracle of Ages as in the Majora's Mask and Ocarina of Time.

The nature of this deity may also be that of an inter-dimensional hero, explaining his presence in both Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. This hero may be someone who cannot directly intervene in grave matters, but can assist the people of whatever dimension he is visiting (much like the mask salesman teaches Link the Song of Healing and seems to be aware of Link's time travel).

SheikahEdit

Due to the fact that his eyes are, for the most part, closed, it is hard to determine the color
Angry Mask Salesman (Ocarina of Time)
of his eyes. However, when he opens them during one of his violent outbursts, they are red. Red eyes are a characteristic commonly connected to the Sheikah. However, the red eye color may stem from the fact that the eyes are bloodshot during his frantic episodes. Additionally, in Ocarina of Time, the Happy Mask Salesman gives Link the Mask of Truth as a reward for selling his masks. The Mask of Truth is a well-known artifact of the Sheikah race. It could be that he somehow obtained the mask during his travels, but it could also have been passed down to him by his would-be ancestors, the Sheikah.

While non-canonical, in the manga, the Happy Mask Salesman's eyes are occasionally open, but since the manga is printed in black and white, it is impossible to determine the eye color. However, the brightness of the irises suggests that the color is a light color, obviously ruling red out, unless it is a lighter shade of red.

Shigeru MiyamotoEdit

Another belief is that the Happy Mask Salesman is an in-game avatar of Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of the Mario series and the Legend of Zelda series. This theory is compounded by his seemingly unlimited knowledge, strange powers, and the appearance of masks resembling Mario and King Dedede, both of which are Nintendo characters. Additionally, Shigeru Miyamoto has stated that as a child, he had dreamed of directing puppet shows before getting into gaming. This could be a further reference to the Happy Mask Salesman, who, in the game, seems to be influencing all of the events from behind the scenes.

Kokiri ForestEdit

"Forest folk shall not leave these woods." — Sign Kokiri Forest is a recurring location in the Legend of Zelda series. A sheltered forest in Hyrule, it is the home of the Kokiri and their guardian, the Great Deku Tree.

Forest HavenEdit

Many people believe that Forest Haven from The Wind Waker is in truth Kokiri Forest. The inhabitants of Forest Haven are strange creatures known as the Koroks, who are believed to be descendants of the Kokiri race. There is also a Great Deku Tree in Forest Haven who is believed to be the Deku Tree Sprout from Ocarina of Time.

Forbidden WoodsEdit

Some people also believe that the Forbidden Woods dungeon from The Wind Waker is Kokiri Forest. While speaking to some of the various Koroks in Forest Haven when receiving the Deku Leaf from the Great Deku Tree, one of them says that the Forbidden Woods used to be their home, and that there are stump shaped houses there. These stump shaped houses resemble the houses found in Kokiri Forest in Ocarina of Time.

Ordon Village/Faron WoodsEdit

It is also believed that Ordon Village from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is Kokiri
Kokiri Forest

Kokiri Forest

Forest. The village is located within an area of Hyrule known as the Ordona Province, located in south-eastern Hyrule in the canonical GameCube version. In Twilight Princess, the area has been settled by Humans and Hylians. Ordon Village also happens to be Link's hometown in the game.

It is equally possible that Kokiri Forest is an area of the Faron Woods that is full of poisonous fog. Its relative location is closer to that of the Kokiri Forest, and the area has a broken bridge that looks similar to the one in the Kokiri Forest. It is also closer to the Forest Temple and the Sacred Grove. However, the distance to the Forest Temple and the Sacred Grove could be just aesthetic changes due to the increased size of Hyrule in Twilight Princess as opposed to Ocarina of Time, meaning that it is equally plausible that Ordon Village is in fact the former Kokiri Forest with just a larger distance between it and the remains of the Great Deku Tree in Faron Woods.

AgahnimEdit

The eye symbol seen on Agahnim's robes in the game's official artwork is supposedly the emblem
Agahnim (A Link to the Past)

Agahnim

of Agahnim. In the game, this symbol can be seen on the floor near the sealed entrance to Hyrule Castle Tower and at the entrance to the room in which Agahnim sends the Seven Maidens to the Dark World. This symbol is strangely reminiscent of the Sheikah Emblem. Also in the manga, Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of time-Part 2, Sheik mentions how the Sheikah symbol was originally just an eye and the tear was added after one of the royal families betrayed the Sheikah, which could mean that Agahnim's symbol is the original symbol of the Sheikahs. However, as the game was released before The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, it could be merely coincidence that the two symbols share similarities. However, in the Temple of Fire in The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, the symbol appears on the floor of the boss chamber and in the room outside, implying a connection.

The eye symbol could also have a connection to the "eye" bosses (i.e. Kholdstare, Arrghus, and Vitreous), making it a common theme among Link's enemies in the game. It is not explained why eyes are significant to Agahnim.

ArmogohmaEdit

It is possible that Armogohma is or is related to Queen Gohma from the Ocarina of Time, as
Armogohma
both
Armogohma Eye (front)

Armogohma

are large arachnids that crawl on the floor and ceiling. They also both drop smaller Gohmas for Link to fight.

Rauru/Auru TheoryEdit

Auru shares some similarities with Rauru, the Sage of Light from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina
Auru

Auru

of Time. Their names are similar and their appearance is somewhat alike; although, Auru looks noticeably thinner than Rauru. Both have also aided the Royal Family and Link. If he and Rauru were related, it may explain his awareness of the Ancient Sages (Rauru himself being a sage and loyal servant of Hyrule's Royal Family). It is possible that Auru may be a descendant or distant relative of Rauru's, but no conclusive information concerning this exists.

Book of MudoraEdit

What appears to be the Book of Mudora has appeared in recent installments of the series. A
Book of Mudora

Book of Mudora

green book resembling the Book of Mudora is seen on a table in Impa's house in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D. This house is in Kakariko Village, the same town where the book is found in A Link to the Past. Another identical green book can be found on setting on a chair in the Lakeside Laboratory. The only difference between these books and the Book of Mudora in Link to the Past is appearance of Sheikah Symbol on the cover in place of a Triforce symbol. However its possible that these books may simply be a Sheikah edition of the Book of Mudora or that the Book of Mudora was actually based on a more ancient Sheikah text found in both Impa's House and Lakeside Laboratory. It is possible that this ancient Sheikah book were later used by Hyrulean Scholars and/or Sages to create the Book of Mudora or that the Book of Mudora is simply a modern edition of those ancient books.

Bottom of the WellEdit

"A long time ago... There was a man in this very village who had an eye they said could see the truth! Now usually, you have to train your mind's eye most strenuously to actually see the truth... But this fella, no, they say he had a different way of doing things... His house stood where the well is now..." — Shikashi

The Bottom of the Well is a mini-dungeon from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. A cavernous
Bottom of the Well

Bottom of the Well

complex, it can be completed at any point after Link has completed the Forest Temple and has learned the "Song of Storms". It is located below the Well of Three Features in the eastern section of Kakariko Village and is only accessible when Link is a child. The evil spirit Bongo Bongo was sealed inside the well, but it breaks free during the events of the game. This mini-dungeon also has the same theme as the Shadow Temple. Link never encounters Bongo Bongo as a child while traversing through the dungeon.

Through analyzing early builds of Ocarina of Time, many fans believe that the Bottom of the Well was originally meant to be the sewers below Hyrule Castle Town. At this time, the area was used to gain access to Hyrule Castle as opposed to the route that made it into the final build of the game.

Bunny HoodEdit

The Bunny Hood (ウサギずきん, Usagi Zukin?) is a recurring mask in the Legend of Zelda series.
Bunny Hood (Majora's Mask)

Bunny Hood

As its name suggests, the mask resembles the upper head of a rabbit, including the eyes and ears. The ears will flop around due to a "jiggle-bone" program when Link walks or perform most other movements such as using the sword and/or jumping.

Pols VoiceEdit

The Bunny Hood bears a resemblance to a Pols Voice, a recurring enemy in the series. This may not be a coincidence, however; when Link sells the Bunny Hood to the Running Man in Ocarina of Time, he states upon receiving the mask, "I bet with those long ears you can hear the voices." This quote may very well indicate a connection between the Bunny Hood and the Pols Voice. The Bunny Hood itself may simply be a reference to The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, in which Link becomes a bunny in the Dark World before obtaining the Moon Pearl.

Star FoxEdit

The Bunny Hood is believed to be a reference to Peppy Hare, an anthropomorphic hare from the Star Fox series. Peppy is a decidedly positive and optimistic character, similar to Grog's attitude before presenting Link with the Bunny Hood. It is one of five masks that are a supposed reference to Star Fox, along with the Bremen Mask, Don Gero's Mask, the Keaton Mask, and the Mask of Scents.

ButterfliesEdit

Butterflies turning into fairies through player interaction may be a reference to Super Mario
Butterfly (Ocarina of Time)

Butterflies

64, in which butterflies turn into 1-up Mushrooms (or, occasionally, explosive bombs) when Mario punches or kicks at a swarm of butterflies.

Composer BrothersEdit

The Composer Brothers may be based on Mario and Luigi, another pair of siblings of Nintendo.
Composer Brother 2

Sharp

Composer Brother 1

Flat

This is supported by the fact that Sharp is the elder brother, short, somewhat wide, and wears red, which is similar to Mario, and Flat is the younger brother, tall, thin, and wears green, which is similar to Luigi; additionally, the Composer Brothers both have mustaches, as do Mario and Luigi. Furthermore, the inscriptions on their gravestones read "Royal Composer Bros."; this truncated form of "brothers" may be a reference to Super Mario Bros.

Death MountainEdit

"Take a good look at that mountain. That is Death Mountain, home of the Gorons." — Impa

Death Mountain (デスマウンテン Desu-Maunten?, Hylian DHylian EHylian AHylian THylian HHylian
Death Mountain Artwork (The Legend of Zelda)

Death Mountain

SpaceHylian MHylian OHylian UHylian NHylian THylian AHylian IHylian N) is a recurring location in the Legend of Zelda series. A huge mountain or mountain range that is typically the highest geographical point of Hyrule, Death Mountain has become a well known location within the series, and serves as the homeland of the proud Goron race in most games. Occasionally, entry to Death Mountain is restricted; one must receive permission from the Royal Family of Hyrule to enter the mighty mountain. It is generally believed that the name Death Mountain is used for many different mountains in the series, but because some of its appearances share certain geographical or topographical similarities, some Death Mountains are believed to be one and the same.

Dragon Roost IslandEdit

It is believed that Dragon Roost Island, an island in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, is
Dragon Roost Island

Dragon Roost Island

Death Mountain. Prior to the events of The Wind Waker, most of Hyrule was flooded and buried at the bottom of what came to be known as the Great Sea. However, the tall Death Mountain managed to stay above water. Gorons have long since left their traditional dwelling, disguising themselves as Traveling Merchants. Instead, the Rito race, a race confirmed to be descendants of the Zora, live here in dwellings cut into Dragon Roost Mountain. The first dungeon, Dragon Roost Cavern, is believed to be Dodongo's Cavern. Dragon Roost Island is not an active volcano like Death Mountain, but there is a small volcano directly south of it called Fire Mountain. Another fact that supports this theory is the existence of Bomb Flowers that grow in Dragon Roost Island as well as in Death Mountain.

Eldin VolcanoEdit

It is also widely believed that Eldin Volcano from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword was later renamed Death Mountain, as it is the only mountainous area in the land that would eventually be known as Hyrule.

Deku Scrub BrothersEdit

"Please forgive me, master! I'll never do it again! If you spare me, I'll teach you something cool. You will never beat my brothers up ahead unless you punish them in the proper order. The order is... 2 3 1" — Deku Scrub

Deku Scrub Brothers

Deku Scrub Brothers

The Deku Scrub Brothers are the mini-bosses of Inside the Deku Tree, the first dungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. They are three Deku Scrubs who guard the door leading to the lair of Queen Gohma, which is at the lowest floor of the dungeon. They also have another sibling, who may be a sister or a fourth brother.

The Deku Scrub Brothers are similar to all other Deku Scrubs in the game; the difference is that this is the only time three are faced at one time. They can only be beaten if they are attacked in a certain order. Earlier in the dungeon, Link defeats another of their siblings, who gives him a clue to beating them. After Link beats them in the order of second, third, and then first, from left to right, they surrender and regretfully unlock the door to their queen's lair.

Super Mario 64Edit

The Deku Scrub Brother's code, 2-3-1, is most likely a reference to a code that was used in an earlier Nintendo game: Super Mario 64. In the Boo's Mansion level, Mario searches the library for a Power Star, and opens the door leading to the star by pushing in three books in the same order as the Deku Scrub Brothers are defeated; namely, 2-3-1. This is a likely connection because The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and Super Mario 64 were both the first 3D games for both of Nintendo's biggest series, and were both developed alongside one another.

QueenEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, the Deku of Termina have a royal family that is in charge of the entire race. In Ocarina of Time, however, The Deku Scrubs may be loyal subjects of Queen Gohma instead of any King Deku. This idea is most clear when Link faces the Deku Scrub Brothers. They refer to her as "Queenie", and act as if she is their ruler. Although they perhaps use this term for respect towards Gohma since she was a curse created by Ganondorf, and in Japanese the suffix -sama is used to refer to nobility or express utmost respect, which could explain its translation to the English version.

Michael JordanEdit

Upon defeat, the traitorous Deku Scrub from whom Link learns how to defeat the Deku Scrub Brothers proceeds to say, "Twenty-three is number one!". This could be a possible reference to one of the team numbers of Michael Jordan, a basketball player who was popular during the time span in which Ocarina of Time was released.

Deku Tree SproutEdit

The Deku Tree residing in the Forest Haven in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker is believed
Deku Tree Sprout

Deku Tree Sprout

to be the mature Deku Tree Sprout from Ocarina of Time. It watches over the Koroks, a race that is suggested to have once been the Kokiri. This is supported by the fact that this Deku Tree does not speak archaically. Rather, it speaks Hylian, which was in use during the events of Ocarina of Time. It also recognizes the green tunic that Link wears.

Din(Goddess)Edit

"Din... With her strong flaming arms, she cultivated the land and created the red earth." — Great Deku Tree Din, the Goddess of Power, is a recurring character in the Legend of Zelda series. She is one of the three Golden Goddesses of Hyrule. Din, along with her sisters Nayru and Farore, came down from the heavens and created Hyrule out of the chaos the land formerly was, each contributing her part in the process. Din, the Goddess of Power, formed the terrain of Hyrule. Upon departure, the three goddesses left the Triforce, the essence of their power, in the Sacred Realm. As the goddess of power, Din is closely associated with the Triforce of Power.

The spell Din's Fire was named after her. The Oracle of Seasons, Din of Holodrum, is named after the Goddess of Power. Din's Pearl, belonging to the Rito people, was also named after her, and said to have once belonged to her. Eldin Province, a province of Hyrule featuring volcanic mountains, is named in her honor. The Light Spirit, Eldin, and its spring were also named after her likeness. In addition, the dragon Eldin is named after the goddess. Her symbol is the Mark of Din.

Goddess of the SandEdit

It is speculated that Din is the Goddess of the Sand that the Gerudo worship. Some evidence
Din

Din

supporting this theory is that Farore could supposedly be the "Goddess of Wind" spoken of in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker and Nayru could supposedly be the "Goddess of Time" spoken of in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. (Note, Farore could also be the goddess of time, as Ciela is the spirit of courage and time in The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, and Farore is the definitely the goddess of courage. Also, the mark of Nayru is on the Isle of Gust in the same game, so she would most likely be the goddess of wind (also, wind tends to be associated with sand). One contradiction, though, is that Lanayru in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, has an abundance of Timeshift Stones. The Arbiter's Grounds in Twilight Princess contain statues resembling the Goddess of Sand, holding flames; fire is often closely associated with Din. She would also be indirectly connected to the Gerudo tribe through Ganondorf's Triforce of Power. However, some contradictions to this theory include Din's Fire being found outside Hyrule Castle, while Nayru's Love is found at the Desert Colossus near the Gerudo's home. Furthermore, the idea that Nayru is the Goddess of Time and Farore is the Goddess of Wind is only speculation. A further refute is that in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, Lanayru Desert is named after Nayru and not Din. The region, however, could have just retained the name as it was a cliff and sea area before.

Mountain GoddessEdit

Some theorize that Din is the Mountain Goddess from The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks. Din is known for creating the earth and its features, which would include mountains. It is possible that, over time, her name faded out of memory and she came to be referred to as the Mountain Goddess. However, the Mountain Goddess has never been mentioned in any games other than Spirit Tracks, by the Gorons or any other race. Also, the eruptions believed to be caused by the Mountain Goddess were in reality caused by Cragma. This may indicate that the Mountain Goddess may not even be real.

Dodongo's CavernEdit

"The Gorons had been blocked from their favorite rockeries ever since King Dodongo appeared and
Dodongo's Cavern

Dodongo's Cavern

moved into the cavern. Only when Link threw a bomb at the entrance to the cavern did hope reappear on the faces of the Gorons."

— Nintendo Power Player's Guide description Dodongo's Cavern (ドドンゴの洞窟 Dodongo no Dōkutsu?) is the second dungeon in the youth portion of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. As its name suggests, Dodongo's Cavern is home to Dodongos and other lizard-like beasts. Dodongo's Cavern is found about halfway up the Death Mountain Trail, however, upon Link's arrival it is blocked by a boulder. Large quantities of Bomb Flowers grow inside the cavern due to its favorably dark and muggy environment.

The Legend of Zelda: Majora's MaskEdit

Oddly enough, Dodongo's Cavern may be known to the Gorons of Termina, as one Goron in the Mountain Village describes the food Goron Link gives him as "Dodongo Cavern's finest quality Rock Sirloin!" Whether this refers to Hyrule's Dodongo Cavern or an unseen parallel location in Termina is unknown.

Fabulously Rich FamilyEdit

The House of Skulltula has many spider webs and eroded bricks, implying that it is one of the
Fabulously Rich Father Transformed

Fabulously Rich Family

oldest buildings in Kakariko Village, an early Sheikah village. The Sheikah distinctions are their pointed ears and red eyes, but since the eyes of the Skulltula family are always closed, it is impossible to see the iris color to determine whether they are Sheikah or Hylian. However, when they are in their spider forms, their open eyes have black irises, possibly a result of the curse.

Fado(The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time)Edit

It is thought that Fado was to be the Sage of Wind of the Ocarina of Time era. This is
Fado

Fado

supported by the fact that a Wind Temple and an Earth Temple were going to be a part of the game but were scrapped due to lack of cartridge space. It can also be supported by the fact she is the only Kokiri with a unique design that has no real significant purpose in the game other than the trading sequence, but with all the beta images of her available and her originally going to be given a name. It could be said that she was going to the sage for a Wind Temple. However, it can be noted that all the sages share the names of the towns in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, and Fado is not one of those names. It is possible that Mido was originally going to be the Wind Sage instead, or Fado was originally going to be named Mido in the finalization.

Faron ProvinceEdit

Faron Province

Faron Province

Some players suspect that Faron Province is in fact the Kokiri Forest region from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. This is supported by the fact that there are enormous wooded areas in Faron Province, along with the Forest Temple, which could be the remains of the Great Deku Tree and the Deku Tree Sprout, explaining the presence of the two large trees. However, Kokiri Forest would need to have spread significantly to encompass the Temple of Time, which is found in Faron Province but is outside of Kokiri Forest during Ocarina of Time.

Farore(Goddess)Edit

If Farore is indeed the Goddess of Wind as Tingle states, the Wind Temple may be dedicated to
Farore(Goddess)

Farore

her.

Since Link holds the Triforce of Courage and is the Hero of Time, Farore may be the Goddess of Time. Evidence supporting this theory is the fact that Ciela, the Spirit of Courage, is also the Spirit of Time. Her symbol is also the Mark of Farore.

Fire TempleEdit

It is possible that the totem pole-like statue found all over the Fire Temple symbolizes the
Fire Temple

Fire Temple

dungeon's patron deity. This statue is never mentioned, but it is seen quite often throughout the temple. Also, all of the other adult dungeons seem to have their own representations.

It is also possible that the Fire Temple is related to Dragon Roost Cavern from The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, as there are paintings in the cavern which resemble Volvagia. It is also possible that the Fire Temple had once been the Fire Sanctuary from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, as the two share similar locations.

Ganondorf's SteedEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Link encounters Phantom Ganon in the Forest Temple. The antagonist's
Ganondorf's Steed

Ganondorf's Steed

phantom rides atop an identical horse to Ganondorf's. Because Ganondorf's Steed is never mentioned in the adult portion of the game and is vaguely implied to be dead, it is possible that he had perished sometime in the past seven years, and that his ghost is the horse ridden by Phantom Ganon. This is supported by the fact that as an adult Link has the chance to win Epona at Lon Lon Ranch by beating Ingo in two horse races. When he accomplishes this, Ingo reveals to Link that he had planned to give Epona to Ganondorf as a gift. Due to this, it is assumed that either Ganondorf's Steed had passed away during the seven years Link was sealed in the Sacred Realm, or Epona is superior to the black stallion. If it is true that Ganondorf's original horse is dead in the Adult Timeline, then it would seem that in the Child Timeline he ether somehow prevented its death or found another steed identical to it. It is also possible that he was riding its ghost, which would explain the ghostly attack he used in battle.

Gerudo ValleyEdit

Although it is never confirmed, it is possible that the Gerudo Desert in The Legend of Zelda:
Gerudo Valley

Gerudo Valley

Twilight Princess is the same as Gerudo Valley or the Haunted Wasteland from Ocarina of Time. This is likely because of how similar the location, environment, landmarks and inhabitants of the locations are.

Goddess of the SandEdit

"The Spirit Temple was built by the ancient ancestors of the Gerudo people. Since only a single male child was born to the Gerudo every hundred years, the massive shrine was built by female masons and engineers." — Nintendo Power Player's Guide

The Goddess of the Sand, also known as the Desert Goddess, is a character first mentioned in
Goddess of the Sand

Goddess of the Sand

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. She is a Deity worshiped by the Gerudo and is the inspiration for the construction of the Spirit Temple found in the Desert Colossus of the Gerudo Desert. What is presumed to be the Goddess also appears in the architecture of the Arbiter's Grounds in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess.

Connection to DinEdit

It is unknown if there is any connection between the Goddess of the Sand and the three Golden Goddesses that created Hyrule. However, there are some interesting things to indicate she could indeed be associated with one of the Golden Goddesses in particular: Din, the Goddess of Power. Din was noted to have "cultivated the land and created the red earth" in the legend of Hyrule's creation, and the Goddess of the Sand is associated with a type of "earth," specifically sand. Also, Din's piece of the Triforce, the Triforce of Power, is closely associated with Ganondorf, a member of the Gerudo tribe. Also, in Twilight Princess, the statue of the Goddess of Sand in Arbiter's Grounds shows her holding flames, a possible reference to the spell Din's Fire. Due to these facts, some fans speculate the Goddess of the Sand could be another title for Din herself. This would be in keeping with the theory that Nayru is the Goddess of Time spoken of in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (Nayru created the laws governing nature, including the laws of time) and Farore being the "Goddess of Wind" spoken of in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker for whom the Wind Temple was built to honor (Farore has long been associated with the element of wind, and the spell Farore's Wind is named after her). Furthermore, although not the goddess herself, the Oracle of Ages, Nayru, has powers over time. Since naming the Oracle the same as the goddess is very unlikely to be a coincidence, having the related figure possess power over time strengthens the notion that the goddess herself would be related to time. This would provide each of the three Golden Goddesses with a separate title in addition to their formal titles: Din, the Goddess of the Sand; Nayru, the Goddess of Time; and Farore, the Goddess of Wind.

Connection to NayruEdit

Another speculation could be that the Goddess of the Sand is Nayru. Nayru's association with water, and therefore time, is evidenced by Sheik stating the flow of time is "like a river". Though the relationship between sand and water is less evident, only the presence of sand near water and on beaches, it is still an arguable point.

ElementsEdit

Confusing the elemental consistencies, in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, the Southeastern desert region is referred to as Lanayru Desert, and the Dragon Lanayru, is actually of the element of thunder. Furthermore, Faron is obviously associated with Farore and the forest, yet is a Water Dragon. Only the Fire Dragon Eldin maintains elemental consistency with his associated Goddess, Din.

This would yield different goddess associations: Farore would be associated with the elements Life and Wind, and the elements would be embodied through Forest and Air, respectively. Din would be associated with the elements Stone and Shadow, and their embodiments would be Fire and Earth, respectively. This leaves Nayru to be associated the elements Ice and Time, embodied through Water and Sand, respectively. This yields, collectively, six element and embodiment pairs, two per goddess. This explains the presence of six sages, one per pair, and two per goddess.

GrannyEdit

Some theories surround the possible family of Granny. One theory states that she is the wife of
Granny

Granny

Mutoh and that the Cucco Lady and Grog are her children. Another theory states that she is the mother of Mutoh and the grandmother of the Cucco Lady and Grog. Since she is referred to as 'Granny' it is more than likely that Anju and Grog are her grandchildren and Mutoh is her son. Although, Mutoh, after being given the Poacher's Saw during the quest for Biggoron's Sword will tell Link that he thought that he had left it with his "old lady", which in English slang refers to someone's wife or girl friend. However, when someone says: "my old man", they are referring to their father, which may have lead to a transliteration error in the English language versions of the game. These theories are taken directly from conversations with other Kakariko Villagers, and none are confirmed.

Great CataclysmEdit

"...Do you know the prophecy of the Great Cataclysm? This is the way I heard it... If a person
Great Cataclysm

Great Cataclysm

who has an evil heart gets the Triforce, a Hero is destined to appear... ...and he alone must face the person who began the Great Cataclysm. If the evil one destroys the Hero, nothing can save the world from his wicked reign. Only a person of the Knights Of Hyrule, who protected the royalty of Hylia, can become the Hero..."

— Maiden The Great Cataclysm is an event mentioned in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. Arguably one of the most important, yet tragic events in Legend of Zelda mythos, it occurs at the moment when Ganondorf enters the Sacred Realm of legend and steals the Triforce, throwing the world into chaos. It is unknown exactly when the Great Cataclysm takes place, but since The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is commonly understood to be when Ganondorf first obtains the Triforce, this is the most likely scenario.

OverviewEdit

After Link cleanses the evils Ganondorf had cast upon the Great Deku Tree, Dodongo's Cavern, and Lord Jabu-Jabu, he gains possession of the three Spiritual Stones, three of the necessary keys to open the Door of Time in the Temple of Time, and to enter the Sacred Realm, the resting place of the wish-granting Triforce. Following Ganondorf's attack on Hyrule Castle, Princess Zelda entrusts the Ocarina of Time, another of the keys to the Sacred Realm, to Link and leaves with him the knowledge of the "Song of Time", the tune necessary to open the Door of Time. Link travels to the Temple of Time and places the Spiritual Stones upon their altar and plays the "Song of Time" on the Ocarina to open the Door of Time. Behind the Door, Link finds the chamber that houses the legendary Blade of Evil's Bane, the Master Sword, the final key to the Sacred Realm that cannot be touched by those of an impure heart. Link pulls the sword from the Pedestal of Time and opens the portal to the Sacred Realm, but is too young to become the legendary "Hero of Time", and thus, he and his fairy companion, Navi, are placed into an enchanted slumber in the Temple of Light, the Triforce's home at the heart of the Sacred Realm, for seven years.

Meanwhile, Ganondorf uses the portal Link creates in the Temple of Time to enter the Sacred Realm. Here, he places his tainted hands on the Triforce, causing it to split apart into its three components, leaving Ganondorf with only the Triforce of Power. The Triforce of Wisdom goes to Princess Zelda, and the Triforce of Courage to Link. The Sacred Realm becomes a reflection of Ganondorf's heart, transforming the once-beautiful Golden Land into a realm of darkness and despair. Still not satisfied, Ganondorf returns to Hyrule and easily conquers the land with the might of the Triforce of Power. For seven long years, he rules the land largely unopposed as the King of Evil, always on the lookout for those two special people chosen by destiny to hold the other two Triforce pieces. Over the course of those seven dark years, Ganondorf eradicates the Knights of Hyrule and infests Hyrule's temples with his minions to prevent the awakening of the Seven Sages, and thus forestall the prophecy of the Hero of Time.

Other PossibilitiesEdit

Although the above seems to be the most likely candidate for the Great Cataclysm, this is never verified in any game. The "Great Cataclysm" mentioned in A Link to the Past could simply be a term used for the events just prior to the start of A Link to the Past, or anything else.

The term "Great Cataclysm" could also not just be a single event, but an event destined to repeat itself every time evil threatens the Triforce of legend. This idea is supported by something one of the Seven Maidens says to Link: "If a person who has an evil heart gets the Triforce, a Hero is destined to appear...and he alone must face the person who began the Great Cataclysm. If the evil one destroys the Hero, nothing can save the world from his wicked reign." This theory was further supported in Skyward Sword, when Demise tells Link that the incarnation of his hatred will continue to plague Link and Zelda's descendants in an endless battle shortly before dying.

Great SwordsEdit

The Great Swords are the default weapon type of Ganondorf in Hyrule Warriors. They are described as a set of Great Swords brimming with dark power. This weapon type has a Darkness Elemental Attribute and its Strong Attack allows Ganondorf to fill his dark energy gauge in order to unleash the collected dark energy in a powerful attack. Ganondorf can also envelop himself in a shadowy shroud that resembles a shadowy version of his Ganon form.

Ganondorf's Level 3 weapons are the Swords of Demise, while their 8-Bit versions are the 8-Bit Magical Keys.

Gerudo Fighting StyleEdit

Ganondorf's dual Great Swords may be based on Gerudo Guards from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina
Great Swords

Great Swords

of Time and The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask as they also wield two swords in combat. This also indicates the possibility that Gerudo train in the art of wielding two swords in combat. Additionally both Ganondorf and the Gerudo Guards guard against attacks by crossing their dual swords together. Alternatively, Ganondorf developed the style himself and it was later adopted by the Gerudo Guards seen in Ocarina of Time. Ganondorf (in The Wind Waker) and Ganon (Ocarina of Time) are both known to dual wield swords/blades in final boss fights indicating it may be his preferred weapon style.

Hammer(Hyrule Warriors)Edit

Hammer is the default weapon type used by Darunia in Hyrule Warriors. It is described as a
Hammer(Hyrule Warriors)

Hammer(Hyrule Warriors)

special hammer for Darunia's use only. Using its Strong Attack allows to preform a Goron Roll Attack and hitting an enemy will allow Darunia to lock on to that enemy to follow up with more Strong Attacks finishing it with a powerful forward slap. Befitting his status as the Sage of Fire, his Hammer has a Fire Elemental Attribute allowing Darunia to add fire into some of combos and even cause lava to erupt from the ground.

InspirationEdit

Darunia's use of a Hammer as his weapon type in Hyrule Warriors, is likely a reference to his ancestor the Hero of the Gorons who was mentioned in Ocarina of Time. The Hero of the Gorons used the might Megaton Hammer to defeat the evil Goron eating dragon, Volvagia. Darunia also originally intended to find and use the Megaton Hammer in Ocarina of Time to defeat Volvagia, but was unable to find its location inside the Fire Temple and decided to face the dragon without it, though he was no match for the might dragon, forcing his sworn brother Link who managed to find the Hammer and used it to defeat the dragon, awakening Darunia as the Sage of Fire.

Hero of TimeEdit

The Hero of Time is a character mentioned in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. According to Rauru, when Link opens the Door of Time and removes the Master Sword from the Pedestal of Time, he attempts to take up the title of the Hero of Time. However, as he is a child, he is unable to do so and as a result he is put into a deep sleep until he has physically grown enough to awaken as the Hero of Time. The Hero of Time is apparently chosen by the Master Sword itself with the express purpose of fighting alongside the Seven Sages. Little else is known about the original Hero of Time though Sheik states that Link, when holding the Master Sword, greatly resembles the Hero of Time meaning it is possible the original Hero of Time is a past incarnation of Link from another game, most likely The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword.

Prophetic FigureEdit

It is never outright stated that there was another Hero of Time before the Link of Ocarina of Time appeared. Sheik's comment about Link resembling the Hero of Time can be interpreted two ways: The first is Sheik was referring to the original Hero of Time or previous incarnation of Link who held the title, however the second interpretation is that given that several characters have demonstrated the ability to have prophetic visions and dreams (Zelda and Link being notable examples), it is possible that at some point someone (such as a member of the Sheikah, a incarnation of Zelda, one of the Light Spirits, Great Deku Tree, or one of the Sages) prophesized the emergence of the Hero of Time (Adult Link from Ocarina of Time). Thus said prophecy (or prophecies) would explains why Sheik said Link resembled the Hero of Time, as he was the very person the prophecy spoke off and Sheik simply meant that Link resembles the prophesized Hero of Time. Also given the fact that Sheik is actually Zelda, it is possible that she herself may have had a prophetic vision of the Hero of Time before she encounter Link under the guise of Sheik (possibly during the seven years Link slept).

Original Hero of Time: The Hero of SkyloftEdit

The most likely candidate for the Hero of Time is the Link from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword as it takes place before Ocarina of Time. Given his role in the creation of the Legendary Blade of Evil's Bane, the Master Sword, his role in defeating the Demon King Demise, and his possible involvement in the creation the Kingdom of Hyrule, anyone of these feats may have contributed to him becoming known as the Hero of Time.

Legendary Heroes of TimeEdit

Another possibility is that the Hero of Time was a title used to referred to a past incarnation or incarnations of Link that preceded the events of Ocarina of Time (as there may have been other incarnations of Link in between the events of Skyward Sword & Ocarina of Time), which have become legendary figures only spoken of Hyrule's various myths and legends. The Link in Ocarina of Time is bestowed the title likely due to his resemblance to the past Hero (or Heroes) of Time that preceded him.

Wielder of the Blade of Evil's BaneEdit

It is also possible that that title is meant to be bestowed onto the one capable of removing the Master Sword from the Pedestal of Time and wield the Legendary Master Sword. Thus Sheik was simply saying that Link resembled the previous wielder of the Sword. However it is likely that this custom was forgotten or fell out of use after the Link's defeat of Ganon in Ocarina of Time, likely because the title became too closely associated with the first Link to face and defeat Ganon.

Hero's ClothesEdit

Because the Link in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword was the first hero chosen by the Gods,
Hero's Clothes

Hero's Clothes

and the knights are seen wearing the Hero's Clothes, it is possible that this is where they originated from, and from this Link they have been passed down. It is more likely however, that the Hero of Time was the one who passed down the idea as shown in Wind Waker and Twilight Princess.

Howling StoneEdit

Since the Howling Stones have the same emblem as the Sheikahs, this hints a deep connection
Howling Stone

Howling Stone

between them (or more specifically, with the Hero's Shade A.K.A the Hero of Time). It's also possible the Howling Stones are somehow connected to the Ocarina of Time due to their mystical powers and same songs used to activate said powers.

Iron KnuckleEdit

In Ocarina of Time, if Link positions himself such that the camera moves just through the
Iron Knuckle

Iron Knuckle

vertices that compose an Iron Knuckle's helmet (and certain other pieces of armor), a Gerudo can be seen inside. Additionally, removing the enemy's top armour piece reveals a feminine figure. It is possible that these Gerudo were brainwashed by Koume and Kotake, just like Nabooru was, as both share the same vacant, wide-eyed stare. These Gerudo may also be seen when the same process is used in Majora's Mask; however, this may simply be a case of reused models. It is also possible that during development, the Iron Knuckles' helmets were meant to fall off during the second stage of the fight, revealing the person inside. Iron Knuckles also emit yells and grunts that sound distinctively male, but so does Nabooru's Iron Knuckle form, which could be the result of the acoustics within the armor(i.e. the sound of the wearer's voice bouncing off the insides of the suit, making it deeper in pitch). Another possibility is that the game designers used existing Gerudo 3D models as a template
Iron Knuckle3

Underneath the enemy's top piece, a female physique can be seen

Iron Knuckle2

A Gerudo's face seen within an Iron Knuckle

around which to base the Iron Knuckle design simply for convenience, and did not intend for Iron Knuckles to be seen as Gerudo. However, this seems unlikely, as the under-the-helmet appearance of regular Iron Knuckles is noticeably different from the mini-boss Iron Knuckle, Nabooru. If the game designers were opting for convenience, all Iron Knuckles would likely bear Nabooru's character model inside them. It is also possible that the designers did not want the identity of the Iron Knuckle fought as a mini-boss revealed earlier in the game.

Keaton MaskEdit

"Is that a "Kee...something..." character mask? I heard he's very popular recently?"
Keaton Mask

Keaton Mask

— Keaton Mask Soldier The Keaton Mask (キータンのお面, Kitan no Omen?) is a recurring mask in the Legend of Zelda series. The mask is based on the mysterious fox-like creature known as Keaton. People's reactions to the Keaton Mask indicate that it is based on a seemingly fictional character named Keaton, who is popular with the children of Hyrule and apparently Termina at one point.

NameEdit

Though an actual Keaton appears in Majora's Mask, this creature is never seen nor made reference to in Ocarina of Time. As a result, the meaning of its name remains a point of speculation. It is possible that the name is meant to be a reference to kitsune, the Japanese word for "fox", which also serves as the name bestowed upon mischievous foxes from Japanese folklore in English retellings.

PikachuEdit

Though an actual Keaton is seen in Majora's Mask, and the mask in Ocarina of Time is recognized as a fox by some characters, the mask may also be a reference to Pikachu from Nintendo's Pokémon series. The mask and Pikachu have similar coloration, and both are very popular among children (in the Zelda universe and the real world, respectively). Lastly, Princess Zelda misidentifies the mask as a mouse, which is the type of creature Pikachu is listed as.

Star FoxEdit

The Keaton Mask is believed to be a reference to Fox McCloud, an anthropomorphic fox that serves as the main character of the Star Fox series. It is one of five masks that are a supposed reference to Star Fox, along with the Bremen Mask, the Bunny Hood, Don Gero's Mask, and the Mask of Scents.

King Zora's ChamberEdit

It is likely, although never explicitly stated, that King Zora's Chamber and the Zora's ThroneKing Zora's Chamber Room from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess are one and the same.

Knights of HyruleEdit

It is possible that the Knights of Hyrule trace their origins back to the Knights of Skyloft
Knights of Hyrule

Knights of Hyrule

from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword as a means of protecting the citizens of Hyrule. The Hylian Shield as well as the Knight's Crest bears a bird motif, possibly representing the Loftwing, further supporting this idea.

Lake FloriaEdit

It is possible that Lake Floria may have become the Zora's Domain or Lake Hylia. This is
Lake Floria

Lake Floria

supported by the fact that Lake Floria is the only large body of water seen during the events of Skyward Sword, and its location relative to the overall map is similar to the location of Lake Hylia in other games in the Zelda series. In addition, the underground cavern of Lake Floria bears some resemblance to the appearance of Zora's Domain.

Lake HyliaEdit

"Beyond this point lies Lake Hylia. It is full of deep, pure water. The Zoras, who live all the way upstream, guard the sunken temple at the lake's bottom, as well as Zora's Fountain." — Kaepora Gaebora Lake Hylia (ハイリア湖 Hairia-Ko?, Hylian LHylian AHylian KHylian EHylian SpaceHylian HHylian YHylian LHylian IHylian A) is a recurring location in the Legend of Zelda series. It is the largest body of water in Hyrule, usually fed by a river that has its source in the mountains.

OriginEdit

Though Lake Hylia is a fictional lake, aspects about it suggest it is a maar lake, a kind of
Lake Hylia

Lake Hylia

volcanic cone. Hyrule has other volcanic activity nearby, such as Death Mountain, establishing that there is volcanism in the area. Lake Hylia itself is small, round, and very deep, which is typical of a bowl-shaped maar. Some of the lake's edges are surrounded with steep slopes, a feature which resembles the formations that arise from a maar's initial bowl-shaping eruption.

It is possible that Lake Hylia is named after the goddess Hylia introduced in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind WakerEdit

Although the lake is not mentioned in The Wind Waker, Hyrule Castle is shown to be situated on a massive rock spire protruding from a large body of water that spans the surrounding area. Some theorize that this is Lake Hylia. It may also be a body of water created by the Great Flood, if the flood was not entirely held back by the seal on Hyrule.

Letter in a BottleEdit

Because Princess Ruto denies writing it it is possible this letter was written by Ganondorf, as
Letter in a Bottle

Letter in a Bottle

he knew of Link's plot to foil his plans, so Ganondorf may have wanted Link to be tricked into going into the belly of Lord Jabu-Jabu, possibly hoping Link would get eaten by the deity. This also may have been a ruse to get Link to get the Zora's Sapphire and open the Door of Time, as Ganondorf wanted to wait until Link did his work for him.

LinkEdit

ReincarnationEdit

A common theory as to why each incarnation of Link looks similar and have similar abilities is
Link

Link

that they are reincarnations of one another. It is notable that when Demise put a curse onto the Skyward Sword, Link, and Zelda, he stated "Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero." which may have been referring to reincarnation. It should be noted however, that Link from The Wind Waker could not be the reincarnation of the Hero of Time since the latter went to the Child Timeline and effectively disappeared from the Adult Timeline. According to the King of Red Lions, the Hero of Winds has no connection to the Hero of Time, though it is unclear whether he is referring to blood relation or reincarnation with this statement. It is worth noting that Ganondorf believes the Hero of Winds is the Hero of Time reborn, though his claim has no concrete evidence. Link from Twilight Princess also could not be the reincarnation of the Hero of Time since, according to Hyrule Historia, he not only met the Hero of Time as the Hero's Shade, but is however his descendant.

RelativesEdit

Another theory as to why each incarnation of Link looks similar to one another is that they are actually related to one another. This is supported by the fact that the Hero of Time is the ancestor of Link in Twilight Princess as well as how it is stated in A Link to the Past that the Master Sword can only be pulled out from its pedestal by the ones who carry the bloodline of the Knights of Hyrule. It is possible that when Demise stated "Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero," when he put a curse on Link and Zelda, he was actually referring to the "spirit of the hero" as a form of will or a set of personality traits rather than the soul itself. If this is the case, this could explain each Link's connection with the Triforce as well as their abilities in physical, mystical, and spiritual ways.

This may mean when he was stating "Those who share the blood of the goddess" he was referring to Skyward Sword Link and Zelda's descendants as the other incarnation of Links rather than the Royal Family of Hyrule, where an alternate reason for the Royal Family having magical powers is the Light Force as hinted in The Minish Cap. This would explain why Link faces other adversaries aside from Ganon, with Zelda (or other members of the Royal Family) sometimes not being present to support the side of good in games such as as Majora's Mask, Link's Awakening and Tri Force Heroes The original Japanese text that Demise states is that his hatred and the Demon Tribe will go under an "evolution", which may mean the curse could involve other villains apart from Ganon himself.

If each Link is related to one another, they need not be related along a single line of descendants. For example, the Hero of Winds cannot be a direct descendant of the Hero of Time since the latter returned to the Child Timeline immediately after his victory over Ganon while being a young preteen in a teenager's body, but provided the Hero of Winds can trace his lineage to Skyward Sword Link, the theory still holds. It is possible that the reason why the Master Sword can only be pulled from it's pedestal by someone who carries the bloodline of the Knights of Hyrule is actually a sub-conscience decision by Fi, who is the spirit of the Master Sword.

MadasEdit

It is possible that in the contemporary Hylian language during the events of Skyward Sword, Link's name may be "Madas" when pronounced. This would explain why Fi, when talking to Link in dialogue that uses his name, often says "Madi Madas" with "Madi" possibly being "Master" in the language. Alternatively, it is possible that Fi's words are gibberish used repetitively in the game, similar to Midna in Twilight Princess.

Link's FatherEdit

Although never confirmed, it is possible that Link's Father is first referenced in A Link to
Link's Father

Link's Father

the Past, as the Pedestal of Time reads:

The Hero's triumph on Cataclysm's Eve, wins three Symbols of Virtue. The Master Sword he will then retrieve, keeping the Knights' line true.

Link from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is presumably the hero mentioned in the above narrative. As a child, he won the three Spiritual Stones: the Kokiri's Emerald, Goron's Ruby and Zora's Sapphire. On the day he completes this quest and returns to deliver the stones to Princess Zelda (the day referred to as the "Great Cataclysm's Eve"), he unwittingly lets Ganondorf into the Sacred Realm by opening the Door of Time, allowing Ganondorf to seize and inadvertently shatter the Triforce. This Link awoke seven years later and retrieved the Master Sword, using it and the power of the Seven Sages to fight Ganondorf/Ganon. The statement that he "kept the Knights' line true" implies he was descended from the Knights of Hyrule, and that possibly, his father was one of these knights.

LizalfosEdit

Lizalfos

Lizalfos

The Lizalfos are probably related to a variety of other, similar, reptilian species. Lizalfos are commonly identified as being related to the 
Dinolfos, although this is easily debatable due to the lack of information between the two species. Dairas are also a likely relative, due to the similar appearance and their use of primitive weaponry. Yet another potential relative are the Tokay, another primitive reptilian species.

The Lost WoodsEdit

The Lost Woods is a recurring location in the Legend of Zelda series. This mysterious, forested
The Lost Woods1

The Lost Woods

region of Hyrule is typically a maze-like forest that requires one to navigate one's way through it by a variety of means.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind WakerEdit

It is theorized by some that the Lost Woods became the Forbidden Woods. Evidence supporting this theory is that the Lost Woods from Ocarina of Time are near Kokiri Forest, and that the Forbidden Woods from The Wind Waker are near the Forest Haven. The Kokiri Forest and the Forest Haven are theorized to be the same place, since they have similar climates and both are home to the Great Deku Tree. Also, there are stump-shaped houses inside the Forbidden Woods which look very similar to the houses of the Kokiri in the Kokiri Forest from Ocarina of Time, and a Korok tells Link that he may see some of their old houses in the Forbidden Woods.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight PrincessEdit

The Sacred Grove in this game is believed by many to be part of the Lost Woods. Though this has
The Lost Woods2

The Sacred Grove

never been officially stated; they carry identical music themes, and both woods are roamed by the Skull Kid. One of the biggest similarities between the Lost Woods in Ocarina of Time and the Lost Woods in Twilight Princess is that the area which holds the Master Sword in the Sacred Grove is exactly the same as the area where Saria sits in the Lost Woods in Ocarina of Time.

Both areas in each game are high, circular chambers deep in the forest. Also, when Link looks up in the Sacred Grove, he can actually see what appears to be the Forest Temple from Ocarina of Time, which appears as an immense archway. There is also a room with a bomb-able rock hiding an Imp Poe and the entrance to a Dig Cavern which also resembles this area.

MalonEdit

"Oh, it's the fairy boy again! I heard that you found my dad! How did you like the castle? Did you see the Princess? Hee hee! Dad came home in a hurry after you found him. Hee hee! Oh yeah, I have to introduce you to my friend, fairy boy! She's this horse. Her name is Epona. Isn't she cute?" — Malon Malon (マロン Maron?) is a recurring character in the Legend of Zelda series. In a majority of her appearances, she and her father Talon are the owners of Lon Lon Ranch, where they raise cows, Cuccos, and horses. Malon also frequently appears in conjunction with the mare Epona as well as "Epona's Song".

Possible Love InterestEdit

There has been speculation and heated debate about the possibility of Malon being Link's love
Malon

Malon

interest. Reasons include one of the Gossip Stones outside the Temple of Time stating that Malon dreams of a knight in shining armor, Talon joking that Link should marry his daughter, and Malon always seeming cheerful around Link, especially after he rescues Epona. Additionally, Malon is the only female besides Navi in either the supporting or main cast who does not become a Sage, which some interpret as being implied to prohibit relationships; when Princess Ruto awakens as the Sage of Water, she says that she cannot offer Link her love now, as she must guard the Water Temple and he must continue his quest, and when Saria awakens as the Sage of Forest, she tells Link that it is their destiny to live in different worlds, though this may also be a result of Link's aging and true identity as a Hylian. Whether these statements still apply when Hyrule is at peace is unclear. It is also unknown whether any of these characters awaken as Sages in the altered timeline that arises when Princess Zelda sends Link back in time to live out his childhood. In the Hyrule Historia, it is confirmed that the Hero's Shade is the Link from Ocarina of Time and the ancestor of Link in Twilight Princess. Many people take the fact that Link is a rancher in Twilight Princess to slightly imply this theory. Link also happens to know Epona's song, which Malon stated that her Mother sang to her as a baby. It may be that the song was passed down to Twilight Princess's Link as with Malon before him. However, it is possible that Link from Ocarina of Time merely passed down all the songs he knew to his offspring which was passed down all the way to Twilight Princess Link, rather than just Epona's Song. Indeed, Link in wolf form can howl other songs from Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask in order to meet the Hero's Shade hinting he actually knew them (although this could be because he learned them from the Howling Stones).The subtle hints of Malon's crush on Link also seem to support this theory, but it is still just only that — a theory...a game theory!

Possible Gerudo AncestryEdit

It is possible that Malon's mother is a Gerudo or has Gerudo ancestry as Malon has vibrant red hair and her father, Talon, gives an interesting reaction when Link approaches him while wearing the Gerudo Mask, he will say that it looks like his wife, but then decides against it. If that is the case, that would raise the question on why she wasn't raised as a Gerudo (although this may be because of her differences compared to the other Gerudos).

The Link in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is a rancher, which could be the result of a relationship between Ocarina of Time's Link and Malon. However, in an interview with Nintendo Power, Eiji Aonuma stated that the Link of Twilight Princess is not necessarily a descendant of the Ocarina of Time Link (although it was confirmed later in Nintendo's official book, Hyrule Historia) Also, Link in no way needs an ancestry of ranchers in order to be one himself.

Man Who Could See the TruthEdit

"A long time ago... There was a man in this very village who had an eye they said could see the truth! Now usually, you have to train your mind's eye most strenuously to actually see the truth... But this fella, no, they say he had a different way of doing things... His house stood where the well is now..." — Shikashi The Man Who Could See the Truth is a character mentioned in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. According to Shikashi, long prior to the events of the game, the Man Who Could See the Truth resided in Kakariko Village. Legend has it that the man had an eye that could see the truth. By the time the events of Ocarina of Time take place however, the man is long gone, and the Well of Three Features is situated where his house once stood.

Lens of TruthEdit

It is probable that the Man Who Could See the Truth's eye is metaphorical for the Lens of Truth. Because the item is found at the Bottom of the Well where the man's house once stood, this seems implied. Another possibility is that the man did literally possess such an eye, and when the Lens of Truth was crafted, his eye was integrated into the artifact. Still another possibility is that the man created the Lens of Truth and used it during his lifetime, and it was placed in the Well after his death to hide it from abusers. Notably, the Lens of Truth resembles the Sheikah Emblem, which is interesting considering that Kakariko was once a Sheikah village.

Dead HandEdit

The mini-boss of the Bottom of the Well, referred to as Dead Hand, could possibly be the spirit of The Man Who Could See The Truth, since this man's house stood formerly where the well is now. This idea is also supported by the fact that Link receives the Lens of Truth by defeating Dead Hand.

Bongo BongoEdit

Bongo Bongo could be the Man Who Could See the Truth due to the fact that it has one eye and was sealed inside the Well of Three Features. His house could have been sent to the Bottom of the Well, along with certain artifacts, among them the Lens of Truth. Also, his description says 'Phantom Shadow Beast'; whereas "phantom" could stand for "dead person", while "shadow" stands for "Shadow Folk", another name for the Sheikah.

Ghost HunterEdit

It is generally accepted that the unnamed character's truth-seeing eye is the Lens of Truth, but it is also possible that he had a real eye that could see the truth. The bright light found in the face of the Ghost Hunter could be an eye. It could be possible that the two are one and the same, as Shikashi remarks that he long since died. Another fact supporting this theory is that the Ghost Hunter even remarks that he can read minds and see the truth.

MasksEdit

Mask1

Deku Shrub Mask

Mask2

Goron Mask

Mask3

Mask

Mask4

Zora Mask

It has been thought that masks in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask could be based off of things from the "real-world". An older coin of New Zealand has a mask that looks somewhat similar to Majora's Mask. Other masks in the game have also been thought to be based off of other things. The Kamaro Mask has been thought to be based off of the Trance Dancer mask, worn by Maori people. The Bremen Mask has been thought to be based off of another Maori mask called the Batik Flame Mask. Other masks and things in the game have also been thought to be based off of Maori masks and items.

The Mask of TruthEdit

The Mask of Truth never turns its wearer into a monster by itself.
Mask of Truth

Mask of Truth

The man wears the mask because of greed. This is shown by both the story as to how he turned into a monster and, when Link picks up the dog in the same room as the man while wearing the Mask of Truth, he is told that his master wore the mask due to his greed. Clearly, when the man put the mask on, he was performing an act of greed.

In Hyrule, specifically Ocarina of Time, Link sees an entire family that is cursed due to its greed. The physical manifestation of the curse involved spiders dispersed throughout Hyrule and the family being turned into spiders. This curse being born from greed is shown to exist.

The location itself was known for spiders in the first place. Outside, Link can read a sign stating, "Fearful Spider House," clearly referring to the cave behind it. Given the fact that the dog is in good health and not dead due to starving, the cave was obviously referred to as the Fearful Spider House before the man went there. This place is tied to the curse, and it was not simply the place chosen for the Gold Skulltulas to roam free due to its close proximity to where the man put on the mask. Instead, it was simply "activated", for lack of a better term. The switch is performing an act of greed in or near it.

MidoEdit

Mido's name is the same as the town Mido in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. All the sages in
Mido

Mido

Ocarina of Time share the name of each town in that game, and in the Hyrule Historia official timeline it is said that the towns were named in honor of the sages in Ocarina of Time. However that would mean that Mido and Kasuto would have been sages as well.

An Earth Temple and a Wind Temple were originally going to be in Ocarina of Time but were scrapped due to lack of cartridge space to store the data. It is possible that Mido was going to be the Sage of Wind in that era and the remaining name of Kasuto could have been the Sage of Earth for that era as well.

Parasitic TentacleEdit

As a tentacle is merely an appendage of a larger organism, the Parasitic Tentacles may be
Parasitic Tentacle
attached to the dungeon's boss, Barinade. Barinade is attached to the roof of its chamber by three tentacles, which potentially extend through Jabu Jabu's body and end in the Parasitic Tentacles Link battled earlier. In the 3DS remake of the game, the colors of the tentacles attaching Barinade to the ceiling are changed to match the colors of the three Parasitic Tentacles.

Pedestal of TimeEdit

Some fans theorize that the pedestal in which the Master Sword was placed at the end of Skyward
Pedestal of Time
Sword is the Pedestal of Time. This is supported by the fact that only Link can wield the sword, and would not have moved it after the events of the game. Also, when the Hylian text on this pedestal is translated, it reads "Hylia". This supports the theory because Hylia is associated with time, and the Sealed Temple is widely believed to have become the Temple of Time.
Pedestal of Time2

Princess ZeldaEdit

The relationship Zelda has with Link is close, possibly her closest. A popular theory among
Princess Zelda
fans is that of a romantic relationship between some of the Zelda and Link characters in the Zelda series. Although never explicitly confirmed in a video game title, this theory is based on hints given in the games, interviews with the game creators, and content of the animated series, comics, and manga (although the last three are generally considered non-canonical).

One hint of a romance between Zelda and Link is given at the end of The Adventure of Link, when the awakened Princess apparently kisses Link under the falling curtain.

Some cutscenes in Ocarina of Time featuring the two together have been interpreted as signs of an attraction. While Link and Zelda are escaping Ganon's Castle, Zelda will additionally show her concern for Link by shouting out whenever he is hurt. Moreover, in the game's final scene, Zelda and Link are floating in the sky together, sharing a decidedly sentimental (if not necessarily romantic) moment where Zelda apologies for involving Link in the events of the game and seems saddened by the situation. She also stated that she will not forget the time she spent with him in the Child Timeline as shown in Majora's Mask through Link's memory.

In addition, if the Oracle games are played as sequels to each other, the ultimate ending sequence shows Zelda lightly kissing Link on the cheek. Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing. In The Wind Waker, when Zelda is asked to stay in hiding in Hyrule Castle while Link restores power to the Master Sword, she waves goodbye to Link, asking him to be careful.

Spirit Tracks features several moments that can be interpreted romantically. Early in the game
Princess Zelda and Link
during the Graduation Ceremony, Zelda walks into the room in front of Link, who is bowing down respectfully. Link then looks up and gasps, blushing at her in amazement. He is then scolded by Chancellor Cole for raising his head without permission. Later, when Zelda's spirit is separated from her body following the first encounter with Chancellor Cole and Byrne, Link is the only one who can see her besides the Lokomos, demonstrating a clear and strong bond between himself and the Princess. After Zelda and Link defeat Byrne in the Tower of Spirits, Byrne, disbelieving, comments that he was beaten by two humans. Zelda, while still possessing a Phantom, says that when she and Link combine their strength, no one can defeat them. Link turns to her, surprised. The background turns white and Zelda's Lullaby plays as they both laugh and high-five, gazing at each other all the while. Toward the end of the game, before the final battle against Malladus, Zelda is reunited with her body, and is no longer able to levitate. Link runs underneath her to catch her as she falls, and she lands on top of him and knocks them both to the ground as well as knock Link out for a few seconds. Upon awakening, Zelda, overjoyed to have her body back, embraces Link, causing him to blush. Finally, after Malladus is defeated, Zelda and Link watch Anjean and Byrne's spirits ascend to the heavens. The camera then lowers to show Zelda and Link holding hands while Zelda's Lullaby plays in the background. After the credits, a short cut scene shows Zelda gazing at a picture of Link on the Spirit Train with her flying beside him, which she keeps on her desk. she may also wave at Link depending on his answer to a question Zelda asked before.

Skyward Sword has several noticeable romantic moments between Link and Zelda. Early in the game, Zelda wants Link to be the first to see her outfit for the Wing Ceremony. She worries over him and she does not want him to fail at becoming a knight. When Link's Crimson Loftwing is hidden by Groose, Zelda assists Link in finding his Loftwing. After Link wins the Wing Ceremony, Zelda jumps off the ledge and Link catches her almost as if she was expecting him to. She then congratulates him on winning. Afterwards, Zelda mentions that she is very happy to be atop the Statue of the Goddess with him. She also gets extremely close to him and almost implies that the two are to kiss, before she pushes him off the statue. Afterward, Zelda bashfully asks Link to go out flying which they do. She then tells Link how amazing the day was, and that she would remember it forever. At the Temple of Hylia, when Zelda states she must seal herself to keep Demise in place, she sheds tears of sadness and states before all this, she was happy just being with Link on Skyloft, demonstrating a deep level of feelings for Link. Link desperately tries to stop her and when she is sealed, Link lowers his head in sadness, showing his deep feelings for her. Much later in the game, when Link releases Zelda from her sealed state, Link runs up and catches her from falling and both of them hug and walk out smiling at each other, holding hands, before Ghirahim ruins the tender moment. During the ending, Zelda asks what Link will do now. Link sweetly smiles at her while their Loftwings fly off toward the sky, implying that he chose to stay on the Surface to live with Zelda.

A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.

The game creators also seem to be fond of the idea of romance between the characters.[1]

Though never directly stated in-game, Shigeru Miyamoto revealed in an interview conducted by Famimaga 64 that Navi is jealous of Princess Zelda and has feelings for Link.[2]

Another less popular theory among fans is that Link and Zelda are related by blood, either as siblings or more distantly. Even though rumors to this effect started with the infamous "Save the Princess... Zelda is your... ... ..." line from A Link to the Past (later reported as a mistranslation), the theory generally revolves around the Link and Zelda from Ocarina of Time.

A possible indication of a blood relation between the two in Ocarina of Time is their physical resemblance: they both have blonde hair, blue eyes, and similar facial features. They also have similarly shaped heads. Graphics limitations could be responsible for some of this similarity, however. Certain dialogue could also be perceived as implying a blood relation: the ghost Sharp comments that Link reminds him of Zelda, and that Link "may have some connection with the Royal Family".[3] Link's connection to the Royal Family is highlighted throughout the game, with Link often playing Zelda's Lullaby to verify it. The fact that Impa agrees to teach a strange boy a song only Royal Family members are allowed to know could also be interpreted as a hint at Link's blood relation to Hyrule's Royal Family. [4]

Additionally, Zelda seems to recognize Link's name upon their first meeting.[5] This could be attributed to her prophetic abilities, although the boy in her dreams seemed to be a largely abstract figure, with no defining traits aside from the presence of a guardian Fairy and a Spiritual Stone. This line of dialogue has often been regarded as a sign that the two have met before, although this could only have occurred when Link was a baby per the Deku Tree Sprout's account of Link's coming to Kokiri Forest. It is also worth noting that while the King of Hyrule is clearly identified as Zelda's father, no mention is made of a Queen. Meanwhile, Link's mother is stated to have died shortly after reaching the forest, but no information is given concerning his father. Given these facts, it is possible that Zelda and Link share the same parents, making them siblings.

RauruEdit

It is believed by many that Rauru is the true form of Kaepora Gaebora, the wise owl that helps
Rauru
Link throughout Ocarina of Time. A major reason for this is that a Gossip Stone seen in the game states that Kaepora Gaebora is the reincarnation of an ancient Sage, and Rauru is implied to have been residing within the Temple of Light for ages, awaiting the time when the Sacred Realm would be opened. Kaepora Gaebora's statement that he thought the tales of the Hero of Time were "merely a legend" could be interpreted as contradictory to this claim; however, it is quite conceivable that over many long years, Rauru himself began to doubt the Prophecy of the Great Cataclysm and the Hero of Time.

Rauru's ages-long vigil in the Temple of Light would also explain why he does not appear with the other Sages at the end of Ocarina of Time: because he can only exist outside the Temple of Light in the form of Kaepora Gaebora, who is shown earlier in the game's ending sequence. This is the case in the noncanonical Ocarina of Time manga, in which Rauru states that his body has withered and died long ago, and that only his soul remains. Additionally, Rauru's continued activity across time as Kaepora Gaebora could explain why he did not have to be awakened by the Hero of Time.

Other hints at Rauru and Kaepora Gaebora being one and the same also exist. For instance, Rauru seems to already know Link's name when he first meets him in the Chamber of Sages. One way he could have learned Link's name is if he had met him before, which Kaepora Gaebora had seven years earlier. Additionally, Rauru's robes are the same color as Kaepora Gaebora's feathery body, and his facial expressions and bushy eyebrows could be seen as mirroring those of the owl. Kaepora Gaebora also seems to hold extensive knowledge of Hyrule and its history—knowledge someone who had been around for ages would have amassed.

This would not be the first or last time two characters turned out to be the same person: the Owl from The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening is revealed to be the Wind Fish's spirit, the King of Red Lions from The Wind Waker turns out to be Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule. Using this, it is possible that Kaepora Gaebora could merely be a vessel for Rauru's spirit, as Agahnim and Zant are to Ganon in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, respectively. It was later confirmed in Hyrule Historia that Kaepora Gaebora and Rauru are indeed the same being.

ReDeadEdit

"During Ganondorf's dark reign, many evil beings walked the earth, but none were as horrible as
ReDead
the ReDead. These skeletal creatures froze people who strayed too close, then they sucked the life from the unfortunate victims."

— Nintendo Power Player's Guide description ReDeads (リーデッド Rīdeddo?) are recurring enemies in the Legend of Zelda series. They are highly emaciated, undead humanoid creatures, closely resembling zombies. They are found in dark and distant locations such as Hidden Holes and dungeons. ReDeads are capable of completely halting the movement of their prey with their gaze when they come close; concurrently, they emit blood-curdling screams to terrify their unfortunate victim. They will then close in on their stunned victim, and in most games will attach to them to drain their life energy. ReDeads are considered to be among the most frightening enemies of the Legend of Zelda series.

OriginEdit

It is possible that ReDeads were once regular, deceased Hylians who happened to be re-animated through exposure to dark magic, or that they are, like Poes, restless spirits wandering the world of the living. Considering the abundance of ReDeads found in the devastated Hyrule Castle Town of the future, as well as underneath the Kakariko Graveyard and inside the Shadow Temple, this theory seems plausible.

Burial CustomsEdit

The differences in appearance and habits between the different incarnations of ReDeads may suggest changes in burial customs over the passing of time. ReDeads found in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask are sometimes encountered underneath graves, and appear to be wearing carved Spooky Masks over their faces. ReDeads found in The Wind Waker are decidedly teal-colored. Since these corpses were all buried below sea level, it is possible they were punished for evil doings, and forced to haunt Hyrule forever.

Sacred RealmEdit

"In a realm beyond sight the sky shines gold, not blue. There, the Triforce's might makes mortal dreams come true." — Book of Mudora verse

The Sacred Realm (聖地 Seichi?, Sacred Land), also referred to as the Golden Land, is a
Sacred Realm
recurring location in the The Legend of Zelda series. The Sacred Realm is described as a mythical plane, or parallel world, created along with Hyrule by the three Golden Goddesses. It is the resting place of the Triforce, an artifact of great power left by the Goddesses. Though the Sacred Realm is linked to Hyrule, the way to access it and acquire the Triforce within is shrouded in secrecy.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

The backstory of A Link to the Past has many similarities to the events of Ocarina of Time. The name "Seven Wise Men" from A Link to the Past is actually a mistranslation, with the original Japanese and later English re-releases giving them the same name as the Seven Sages from Ocarina of Time. Two of Ocarina of Time's developers, character designer Satoru Takizawa and script director Toru Osawa, even stated that the Imprisoning War and Seven Sages mentioned by A Link to the Past were the same events and characters seen in Ocarina of Time. Despite this, there are some details which conflict between the two accounts. Many fans consider these details to be retconed in the face of overall similarities and developer confirmation, while others maintain that the two games are describing separate events and characters.

Silent RealmEdit

The Silent Realm from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is theorized to be the Sacred Realm. In Skyward Sword, Link obtains all three pieces of the Triforce in a place which appears to be the Silent Realm, given the area's identical appearance, method of entry, and Link's lack of items in the area. Because the stories of the creation of Hyrule state that the Triforce was left in the Sacred Realm, it would make sense that in Skyward Sword, which is generally accepted as the first game in the chronology of the series, the Triforce would be found in the Sacred Realm. The Silent Realm also changes to appear golden upon Link's acquisition of the full Triforce, similar to the Sacred Realm's description as the "Golden Land". However, the nature of the Silent Realm is distinctly different from that of the Sacred Realm. While both are equivalent worlds to Hyrule, the Silent Realm is a spirit world which only Link can enter, leaving Fi, his items, and his own physical body behind. The Sacred Realm, however, is a normal physical world, which any person can enter with their own body and equipment.

Seven SagesEdit

"When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand..." — Sheik

The Seven Sages are a group from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Powerful allies of Link,
Seven Sages
they help seal Ganondorf in the Sacred Realm. The sages who give Link the Six Medallions each represent the six races of Hyrule: Hylian, Kokiri, Goron, Zora, Sheikah and Gerudo.

Sage of TimeEdit

While six of the Seven Sages are each associated with an element of sorts, Princess Zelda was named only as the Leader of the Sages. Some speculate that Princess Zelda could be the Sage of Time. Reasons behind this theory include:

The Temple of Time's close proximity to Hyrule Castle during the events of Ocarina of Time (each Sage lived near their respective temples). Zelda's ability to send Link seven years to the past in the Child Timeline at the end using the Ocarina of Time. Zelda's apparent alignment with Nayru, the Goddess long associated with the establishment of the laws of science and nature, including time; it has been suggested that she is the Goddess of Time spoken of by Zelda herself in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, which Zelda entreated to protect and look after Link on his journey to Termina. Zelda's revelation of her identity as the seventh Sage in the Temple of Time (along with the vision of her in the Temple of Time when she taught Link the Song of Time) suggests she has a connection to that particular temple; it is also curious to note that each Sage revealed their status as a Sage within their respective temples, again implying that Zelda is connected to the Temple of Time.

Seven Wise MenEdit

The Seven Wise Men mentioned in the backstory of A Link to the Past are widely believed to be the Seven Sages due to a number of similarities, including the nature of their seal on the Dark World. The term "Wise Men" was a mistranslation of what would more accurately be called "Sages", and the term was replaced with "Seven Sages" in the Game Boy Advance port of the game. In an interview conducted at the time of Ocarina of Time's release, the game's character designer, Satoru Takizawa, and the game's script director, Toru Osawa, stated that the apparent Imprisoning War and the Seven Sages seen in Ocarina of Time are the same ones mentioned in A Link to the Past. Despite this, they and their descendants are all depicted as human. It was later confirmed in Hyrule Historia that the Seven Sages and the Seven Wise Men are indeed the same people.

=Ancient SagesEdit

The Seven Sages, minus Princess Zelda, may be connected to the six Ancient Sages seen in Twilight Princess. It seems that these Sages may be the essences that entered the bodies of those Seven Sages in Ocarina of Time, causing their awakening as sages. It also seems that Rauru could be both an Ancient Sage and one of the Seven Sages.

ShabomEdit

Shaboms make a possible appearance in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. Rather then attacking
Shabom
Link, however, they encase Stray Fairies in many dungeons and different areas. Whether they are actual Shaboms or not is unconfirmed.

Six MedallionsEdit

The design of the symbols on Forest, Fire, and Spirit Medallions are first introduced in
Light Medallion
Shadow Medallion
Water Medallion
Spirit Medallion
Fire Medallion
Forest Medallion
Ocarina of Time; however, the Light, Water and Shadow Medallions may have been extracted from locations in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. The teleport point at Death Mountain in A Link to the Past is a circle where several rocks compose a symbol very similar to the one shown in Light and Shadow Medallions. Upon entering in the portal, in the Dark World counterpart of this location, there is another circle, where bushes compose the Water Medallion.

Skull Kid(Character)Edit

It is widely believed--and highly implied in Majora's Mask--that the Skull Kids in Ocarina of
Skull Kid3
Time and Majora's Mask are one and the same. While no statement is outright made regarding this, it seems like a reasonable doubt that this is what the games creators' intended.

Firstly, after encountering Link in the Lost Woods after having ambushed him, the Skull Kid appears to recognize Link, but deems it to not be a problem. Later, after the Skull Kid is removed from the influence of Majora's Mask, he tells Link that "he smells like that fairy kid who taught him that song in the woods." In Ocarina of Time, Link plays Saria's Song to a Skull Kid in the Lost Woods, who then becomes his friend.

Additionally, Link sells the Skull Mask to the same Skull Kid, indicated a prexisting interest in masks, which could have motivated the Skull Kid's theft of Majora's Mask. Lastly, after the ending credits of Majora's Mask, the final image shown is a stump bearing carvings of the Skull Kid, Link, Tatl, Tael, and the Four Giants. After a certain amount of time, Saria's Song will play.

It is also possible that the Skull Kid is the same Skull Kid, or a descendant of the Skull Kid from A Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. This is supported by the fact that the Skull Kid knows Saria's Song.

Multiple Ganon TheoryEdit

The Multiple Ganon Theory is the theory that there exists more than one Ganon/Ganondorf in the Zelda timeline, in much the same way that Link and Princess Zelda exist as more than one person throughout the Legend of Zelda series. Variations include ideas that Ganondorf is locked in the same cycle of reincarnation as Link, or that Ganon is a malevolent demon who possesses people, Ganondorf being one such host. Supporting the reincarnation idea, it is said by the Gerudo that only a single male is born into their tribe every one hundred years. Depending on the game, he is said to be destined to become either the King of the Gerudo or the guardian of the desert and the Gerudo.

Although the theory has been around for quite some time, most modern versions of this theory stem out of Ganondorf's back-story in The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, which conflicts with Ganondorf's back-story in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. In Four Swords Adventures the Gerudo talk about a man named Ganondorf who had been born and lived in the Desert of Doubt with them. They mentioned that he had grown into an evil man with a lust for power and had broken their laws by stealing a Trident deep in the desert that gave him incredible powers, such as transforming him into Ganon.

This is in direct contrast to the back-story Ganon was given in Ocarina of Time, in which he is acknowledged by many as the king of the Gerudo, and does not become Ganon until acquiring the Triforce of Power. Additionally, the back-story of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, which explains the actions of the Ganondorf from Ocarina of Time in an alternate timeline, says that a tribe of thieves, most likely the Gerudo, followed him in his attack on Hyrule, again showing that he was accepted as king.

There are only three logical explanations to these conflicting back-stories:

One is that a single Ganondorf had ventured to the desert and stolen the Trident, broke out of the seal he was placed at at the end of Four Swords Adventures but was not killed by Link, turned back into Ganondorf, and returned to the Gerudo later at a time that they were willing to acknowledge him as king. This would require that Four Swords Adventures take place before Ocarina of Time. The second explanation is that the game is not part of the overall storyline within the series, though official statements indicate that all the games from the main series are included in the official timeline document. The third explanation is that the Ganondorfs from the two games are separate incarnations, much like the many Links, Zeldas, and other characters who are seen multiple times throughout the series. This theory is supported by a quote at the end of Four Swords Adventures in which Princess Zelda calls Ganon an "ancient demon reborn". This is similar language to a line in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker in which Ganondorf calls the game's incarnation of Link "The Hero of Time, reborn". Another solid point for this theory is the apparent death of Ganondorf/Ganon five separate times throughout the series. An individual Ganon is only shown to be resurrected once. Even with this resurrection, and the split timeline allowing a single individual Ganon to die twice, there would still need to be three separate Ganons in order to account for all of the presumed deaths. In order for all of the Ganons in the series to be the same, Ganon would have to have been brought back to life on two additional occasions not hinted at by any of the games, or survived at least two of his apparent deaths.

In The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, Demise states that his hatred will be reincarnated and attack in a cycle without end. This is often interpreted as meaning that Ganon's repeated appearances are a result of this cycle. If Ganon as we know him is a result of Demise's hatred continuously reincarnating itself, there would be further support for the idea that multiple Ganons could continue to appear even as previous ones are slain. This would support the Multiple Ganon Theory as each Ganon would be a separate incarnation in this cycle, though all of them would share the same basic origin of forming from Demise's hatred.

While the Multiple Ganon Theory has yet to gain wide spread acceptance, it has nonetheless gained the respect of some timeline theorist and fans of the series.

Shigeru Miyamoto has stated that although each Link and Zelda are reincarnations, there is "only one Ganon". However, this statement may now be outdated or may have been made based on a lack of information, as Miyamoto is no longer as involved with the Zelda storyline as he previously was.

According to the Hyrule Historia, a second Ganondorf is born during the events leading to Four Swords Adventures. The book either implies or states directly that the rest of Ganon's appearances are the same being brought back to life, or versions of him in alternate timelines.

Sky WritingEdit

Sky Writing is similar to Hylian writing, meaning some of the language the Hylians learned may have been adopted from the Oocca.

Spectacle RockEdit

Spectacle Rock, located at the summit of Death Mountain, presumably appears as an island on the
Spectacle Rock (The Legend of Zelda)
Great Sea known as Spectacle Island. The Great Sea, the country in which the game is set, was in truth created when Hyrule was flooded by the Gods. Spectacle Rock, the very top of the tall, tall Death Mountain, is the only surviving landmark of that area. However, there is a conflicting theory that Dragon Roost
Spectacle Island
Island is Death Mountain, due to the ring of smoke seen on Link's first visit there and the fact that it is a volcano, as well as the fact that it is taller than all other Islands in the game.

Split TimelineEdit

It is speculated by some that alternate worlds such as the Twilight Realm and Termina may be unaffected by the timeline split. However, while these two realms are alternate dimensions, there is no evidence to support the idea that they exist outside of linear time. Both realms have demonstrated the ability to receive beings from the Child Timeline and return them to the Child Timeline when they exit back into Hyrule. There is no reason to believe that these two realms would only exist as a single timeline, or that they could "prioritize" inputs from one timeline, and later output these into both the timelines.

In addition, the renowned Youtube show, Game Theory, dismissed the Zelda Timeline, particularly the Defeat Timeline (in where Link fails on his quest) on the grounds that "the hero cannot be simultaneously victorious and defeated". Elaborating, he explained that with Link defeating Gannondorf, two perfectly possible timelines are created; However if Link dies at any point in his journey another separate timeline is created. Explaining that the only way for all 3 timelines to exist is the Many Worlds Theory (the theory that all possible pasts and futures exist in separate timelines). [1]

StalchildEdit

It is possible that the Stalchildren of Ocarina of Time are Kokiri who have left the Kokiri
Stalchild
Forest, thus turning into Stalchildren. They could also be Hylians who are suffering the effects of the Lost Woods, with a Stalchild being an intermediary stage between a Hylian and a Stalfos. However, since the Stalfos transformation is supposedly imposed on those unable to find their way out of the Lost Woods, it seems unlikely that such individuals would appear in Hyrule Field. Additionally, Kokiri are seen outside the Forest during the end credits of Ocarina of Time, suggesting that their law of "Those who leave the forest will die" is simply a warning of the dangers posed by the outside world.

StallordEdit

"You still live... How astonishing. No wonder some call you "hero". But this is truly a bittersweet reunion... Truly! For I fear this is the last time I will see you alive!" — Zant

Twilit Fossil, Stallord (蘇生古代竜 ハーラ・ジガント Sosei Kodai Ryū Hāra-Jiganto?, Resurrected
Stallord
Ancient Dragon Hahra Gigant) is the boss of the Arbiter's Grounds, the fourth dungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. Stallord is the skeleton of a dead beast found inside the Arbiter's Grounds. It has a roughly humanoid upper body protruding from a pit of sand, and a horned animal head comparable to a goat or dragon. Its lower body is never seen; in fact, whether its lower portions were even present at the time is unknown. Several weapons are embedded in the beast's skull, possibly the cause of its death. The music played during the battle against Stallord incorporates, partly, reinstrumentalized versions of the music played during the battles against King Dodongo and Volvagia in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. By name, it is the king of the Stalfos in Arbiter's Grounds.

VolvagiaEdit

Stallord may be the dragon Volvagia from Ocarina of Time, as he was never revived in the Twilight Princess timeline and has a very similar appearance (aside from being only a skeleton), abilities (fire breathing) and the same music. However, this seems unlikely, as Stallord is considerably bigger than Volvagia was, and Stallord is found in the Arbiter's Grounds which is directly across from Death Mountain where Volvagia had lived. There are also physical differences such as Stallord having some hair around its neck, while Volvagia had a mane of flames; Stallord's dental structure differs from Volvagia's; Stallord has ten digits in all while Volvagia only has six; and Stallord has relatively long arms, while Volvagia's in comparison are very short.

Another way Stallord could have been Volvagia is that technically, Link never fought Volvagia in the first place. Due to Princess Zelda sending Link back in time, and Link stopping Ganondorf from taking the Triforce of Power, Volvagia was never killed by Link in the child timeline. Some believe that as a last resort, Ganondorf created a few monsters (one being Volvagia) but was arrested by the Sages. The reason Stallord was in Arbiter's Grounds may be because Volvagia couldn't be killed, so they sealed it inside its chamber to keep it from doing any harm. How Volvagia died however, is a different story. It very well could have been starvation. The vast numbers of Staltroops seemed to wear similar armor to the Knights of Hyrule, so they may have been the warriors that died helping to take down and seal up Volvagia.

King DodongoEdit

o a theory that Stallord is King Dodongo, another boss from Ocarina of Time, which is reptilian in appearance, similarly to Stallord. Sections of the music played during the boss battle against King Dodongo are reused during the battle against Stallord. However, this theory is also discredited based on several physical differences (arm length, digit number, general proportion of limbs, torso, hair and head). Also, the Desert and the Mountains are very far apart, and when King Dodongo was defeated, his body was apparently trapped in the lava of his own chamber.

Dark DragonEdit

It is also possible that Stallord is based on General Onox's Dark Dragon form from The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons. The body proportions, in terms of arm length, horn size and shape, and facial structure, are quite similar. In addition, Stallord's lack of a lower half rings similar to how Onox has a tail and no hind legs. However, the Dark Dragon only has four fingers, unlike Stallord, and also had wings, which Stallord lacks (although they may have been buried in the sand before the events in the game). Also the Dark Dragon only seems to have eight teeth during its boss fight, unlike Stallord, which has ten teeth (although arguably, not all of the Dark Dragon's teeth were seen). Lastly, Holodrum and Hyrule are very far apart. However, it should be noted that Onox's speech before the final battle implies that he was actually native to the Dark Realm and not to Holodrum.

Execution BeastEdit

Another possibility is that Stallord was used for execution when the Arbiter's Grounds were still in use, due to Stallord's chamber being situated directly beneath the chamber where those condemned were banished to the Twilight Realm. The chamber itself seems like it was designed so that several people would be placed on the pillar and lowered to the bottom where Stallord would subsequently devour them. Supporting this is the abundance of Staltroops, being animated skeletons, which are theorized to be prisoners killed by Stallord.

Other OriginsEdit

Another possibility is that Stallord was simply an unnamed monster killed prior to the game by another hero. Throughout the Arbiter's Grounds, wall engravings show a figure with a shield fighting a large monster, possibly Stallord, which may suggest that Stallord's first death was because of an ancient hero and not of natural causes. Shapes similar to Stallord's head are on all the doors in the Arbiter's Grounds.

The chamber Stallord is found in shares a couple of shapes similar to the Sealed Grounds in Skyward Sword: downward-pointed cone (although this is not the shape of the chamber itself, but rather of the sand during the first part of the battle), and spiral (the tracks Link rides, and the edge of the Sealed Grounds pit). Stallord also has a sharp object embedded in the top of it's skull, a similarity it shares with Demise. It may be that the game's designers intended to infer that the two bosses are somehow linked, or were merely drawing on a previous game for design. The similarities could also be purely coincidental. In SS the Sealed Grounds and Gerudo are far apart, diminishing the likelihood that Stallord is Demise's remains.

TalonEdit

As Malon is confirmed to have been based on Marin, a character from The Legend of Zelda: Link's
Talon
Awakening, it is assumed that Talon is based on Marin's father, Tarin, from the same game. Both are reminiscent in appearance to Mario, and their daughters share many similarities as well.

In The Legend Of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time, Talon gives an interesting reaction to the Gerudo Mask if Link approaches him as a child while wearing it, saying that it looks like his wife, but then decides against it. This reaction hints Malon's mother has Gerudo ancestry. This would explain Malon's vibrant red hair, which appears to be a recessive trait among most Hylians. This has never been confirmed by Nintendo.  

Temple of the Sacred SwordEdit

Sacred GroundEdit

It is possible and likely that this temple was build on the Sacred Grove and the remains of the Temple of
Temple of the Sacred Sword
Timefrom Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).thumb|link=http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Temple_of_Time_(Twilight_Princess)from Twilight Princess (which appears as a past era in Hyrule Warriors). Evidence of this is found in the sacred pedestal chamber (the sacred pedestal itself is likely the Pedestal of Time), which is overgrown with plant life which the rest of the temple lacks. Also the temple is said to have been built on holy ground, both the Sacred Grove and the Temple of Time fit that description, as the Temple of Time was originally built on the entrance to the Sacred Realm where the Triforce originated. The Sacred Grove was all that remained of the original temple and possibly the original Hyrule Castle Town (as Hyrule Castle in Twilight Princess is closer to Lake Hylia indicating that the original castle and town where likely abandoned at some point between Ocarina of Time &Twilight Princess).

Temple of Time RestoredEdit

If the Temple was built on the Sacred Grove, then it may possibly be an attempt to rebuild the Temple of Time and the buildings surrounding it may have been an attempt to rebuild Hyrule Castle Town but the plan to rebuild the town was either abandoned or the town was simply built to house the builders/engineers/craftsmen (and possibly Hyrulean Soldiers) while they were constructing the current Temple or to act as fortifications to assist the Ghost Forces in repelling their enemies outside the Temple. After Ganondorf's Soul Fragment was sealed within the Temple by the Master Sword, the temple was likely abandoned to prevent Ganondorf's escape and due to the likelihood of Ganondorf's minions may try to attack the temple to free their Master's soul (which is same reason why the Ghost Forces remained behind to defend the Temple from trespassers and monsters). Evidence that it is the reconstruction of the Temple of Time is the Door of Time that is the door to the Sacred Pedestal chamber and the main Temple's overall emptiness (a trait of the original Temple fromOcarina of Time). It is likely that over time the rebuilt Temple of Time simply became known as the Temple of the Sacred Sword due to its role in housing the Blade of Evil's Bane which kept King of Evil under seal and/or is simply another name for the Temple of Time.

Tetra's Pirates(Wind Waker)Edit

It is possible that each crew member is a reincarnation and/or descendant of one of the Royal
Tetra's Pirates
Family of Hyrule's aides. This is supported by the fact that each person seen with Zelda in the painting found in Hyrule Castle has an almost exact resemblance to a member of the crew. Considering that Tetra is Princess Zelda, a descendant of the Royal Family, and that the pirates are all Hylian despite that race being rare on the Great Sea, it is likely that the pirates could be the successors of the individuals in the aforementioned painting.

Thrill Digger Area(Skyward Sword)Edit

"This is the Thrill Digger area. It is a game run by a Mogma called Tubert. It appears as though there is another Mogma here. There is a 95% chance that he has some information." — Fi The Thrill Digger area is a cave that appears in The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. The entrance located behind a bombable wall between two huts in a Bokoblin camp in Eldin Volcano. As its name implies, it is where Mr. Tubert's Thrill Digger mini-game can be played. Besides Thrill Digger, the cave features Rupee Ore on the walls of the cave, which Link can shoot to make them drop Rupees who value is based on the color of the Ore. However hitting Black Rupee Ore will drop Rupoors. There also a few digging spots around the fenced in game area. Link can also chat with Mr. Tubert by sitting on the chair near him (which is useful for healing Link if he takes to much damage from the Bomb Flowers in Thrill Digger). If Link asks him all three available questions then quits talking, Mr. Tubert will tell Link about the Rupee Ore found in his cave. There is also a stone tablet near the exit which Link can read to receive a helpful tip on playing Thrill Digger.

Besides Mr. Tubert, there is also another Mogma named Zanc appears in the back of the cave and will offer Link a hint on how to win at Thrill Digger in exchange for 20 Rupees. Later in the game, Link can play the Goddess's Harp near a swarm of Blessed Butterfly to summon a Gossip Stone.

Rupee Ore MineEdit

The Rupee Ore found in the Thrill Digger area may explain where all the Rupees (and dreaded Rupoors) in Thrill Digger come from. It also may indicate that at some point after the defeat of Demise it may have been mined for its valuable Rupee Ore. If Eldin Volcano eventually became Death Mountain (possibly due to it becoming less volcanically active), then most of the Rupee Ore may have been mined out (due to the lack of Rupee Ore on Death Mountain), yet some of it remained in smaller quantities inside the rocks for Death Mountain, which when the rocks where broken open turned it Rupees. This would explain why Rupees can often be found by breaking the small rocks on Death Mountain in Ocarina of Time.

TimelineEdit

"Just a Legend" TheoryEdit

Some fans say that the chronology of the series should not be so rigid. Just as real-world legends are retold with different variations (e.g. the flood), each game could merely be a different retelling of the same story. With each advancement in videogame hardware and the ever-changing desires of the consumer, the base story of Link saving Princess Zelda from Ganon and recovering the Triforce is embellished, modified, and changed outright. Just like any other legend, The Legend of Zelda changes as it is retold through the years. Despite the fact that Aonuma and Miyamoto have confirmed the existence of a timeline, this remains a popular theory.

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