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These are theories that have to do with both The Legend of Zelda:  Twilight Princess and The Legend of Zelda:  Ocarina of Time.  

Ordon Village/Kokiri Forest TheoryEdit

It is believed that Ordon Village from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is Kokiri Forest. The village is

Kokiri Forest

Kokiri Forest

located within an area of Hyrule known as the Ordona Province, located in south-eastern Hyrule in the canonical GameCube version. In Twilight Princess, the area has been settled by Humans and Hylians. Ordon Village also happens to be Link's hometown in the game.

It is equally possible that Kokiri Forest is an area of the Faron Woods that is full of poisonous fog. Its relative location is closer to that of the Kokiri Forest, and the area has a broken bridge that looks similar to the one in the Kokiri Forest. It is also closer to the Forest Temple and the Sacred Grove. However, the distance to the Forest Temple and the Sacred Grove could be just aesthetic changes due to the increased size of Hyrule in Twilight Princess as opposed to Ocarina of Time, meaning that it is equally plausible that Ordon Village is in fact the former Kokiri Forest with just a larger distance between it and the remains of the Great Deku Tree in Faron Woods.  

Multiple Ganon TheoryEdit

The Multiple Ganon Theory is the theory that there exists more than one Ganon/Ganondorf in the Zelda timeline, in much the same way that Link and Princess Zelda exist as more than one person throughout the Legend of Zelda series. Variations include ideas that Ganondorf is locked in the same cycle of reincarnation as Link, or that Ganon is a malevolent demon who possesses people, Ganondorf being one such host. Supporting the reincarnation idea, it is said by the Gerudo that only a single male is born into their tribe every one hundred years. Depending on the game, he is said to be destined to become either the King of the Gerudo or the guardian of the desert and the Gerudo.

Although the theory has been around for quite some time, most modern versions of this theory stem out of Ganondorf's back-story in The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, which conflicts with Ganondorf's back-story in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. In Four Swords Adventures the Gerudo talk about a man named Ganondorf who had been born and lived in the Desert of Doubt with them. They mentioned that he had grown into an evil man with a lust for power and had broken their laws by stealing a Trident deep in the desert that gave him incredible powers, such as transforming him into Ganon.

This is in direct contrast to the back-story Ganon was given in Ocarina of Time, in which he is acknowledged by many as the king of the Gerudo, and does not become Ganon until acquiring the Triforce of Power. Additionally, the back-story of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, which explains the actions of the Ganondorf from Ocarina of Time in an alternate timeline, says that a tribe of thieves, most likely the Gerudo, followed him in his attack on Hyrule, again showing that he was accepted as king.

There are only three logical explanations to these conflicting back-stories:

One is that a single Ganondorf had ventured to the desert and stolen the Trident, broke out of the seal he was placed at at the end of Four Swords Adventures but was not killed by Link, turned back into Ganondorf, and returned to the Gerudo later at a time that they were willing to acknowledge him as king. This would require that Four Swords Adventures take place before Ocarina of Time. The second explanation is that the game is not part of the overall storyline within the series, though official statements indicate that all the games from the main series are included in the official timeline document. The third explanation is that the Ganondorfs from the two games are separate incarnations, much like the many Links, Zeldas, and other characters who are seen multiple times throughout the series. This theory is supported by a quote at the end of Four Swords Adventures in which Princess Zelda calls Ganon an "ancient demon reborn". This is similar language to a line in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker in which Ganondorf calls the game's incarnation of Link "The Hero of Time, reborn". Another solid point for this theory is the apparent death of Ganondorf/Ganon five separate times throughout the series. An individual Ganon is only shown to be resurrected once. Even with this resurrection, and the split timeline allowing a single individual Ganon to die twice, there would still need to be three separate Ganons in order to account for all of the presumed deaths. In order for all of the Ganons in the series to be the same, Ganon would have to have been brought back to life on two additional occasions not hinted at by any of the games, or survived at least two of his apparent deaths.

In The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, Demise states that his hatred will be reincarnated and attack in a cycle without end. This is often interpreted as meaning that Ganon's repeated appearances are a result of this cycle. If Ganon as we know him is a result of Demise's hatred continuously reincarnating itself, there would be further support for the idea that multiple Ganons could continue to appear even as previous ones are slain. This would support the Multiple Ganon Theory as each Ganon would be a separate incarnation in this cycle, though all of them would share the same basic origin of forming from Demise's hatred.

While the Multiple Ganon Theory has yet to gain wide spread acceptance, it has nonetheless gained the respect of some timeline theorist and fans of the series.

Shigeru Miyamoto has stated that although each Link and Zelda are reincarnations, there is "only one Ganon". However, this statement may now be outdated or may have been made based on a lack of information, as Miyamoto is no longer as involved with the Zelda storyline as he previously was.

According to the Hyrule Historia, a second Ganondorf is born during the events leading to Four Swords Adventures. The book either implies or states directly that the rest of Ganon's appearances are the same being brought back to life, or versions of him in alternate timelines.

Princess ZeldaEdit

The relationship Zelda has with Link is close, possibly her closest. A popular theory among
Princess Zelda
fans is that of a romantic relationship between some of the Zelda and Link characters in the Zelda series. Although never explicitly confirmed in a video game title, this theory is based on hints given in the games, interviews with the game creators, and content of the animated series, comics, and manga (although the last three are generally considered non-canonical).

One hint of a romance between Zelda and Link is given at the end of The Adventure of Link, when the awakened Princess apparently kisses Link under the falling curtain.

Some cutscenes in Ocarina of Time featuring the two together have been interpreted as signs of an attraction. While Link and Zelda are escaping Ganon's Castle, Zelda will additionally show her concern for Link by shouting out whenever he is hurt. Moreover, in the game's final scene, Zelda and Link are floating in the sky together, sharing a decidedly sentimental (if not necessarily romantic) moment where Zelda apologies for involving Link in the events of the game and seems saddened by the situation. She also stated that she will not forget the time she spent with him in the Child Timeline as shown in Majora's Mask through Link's memory.

In addition, if the Oracle games are played as sequels to each other, the ultimate ending sequence shows Zelda lightly kissing Link on the cheek. Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing. In The Wind Waker, when Zelda is asked to stay in hiding in Hyrule Castle while Link restores power to the Master Sword, she waves goodbye to Link, asking him to be careful.

Spirit Tracks features several moments that can be interpreted romantically. Early in the game
Princess Zelda and Link
during the Graduation Ceremony, Zelda walks into the room in front of Link, who is bowing down respectfully. Link then looks up and gasps, blushing at her in amazement. He is then scolded by Chancellor Cole for raising his head without permission. Later, when Zelda's spirit is separated from her body following the first encounter with Chancellor Cole and Byrne, Link is the only one who can see her besides the Lokomos, demonstrating a clear and strong bond between himself and the Princess. After Zelda and Link defeat Byrne in the Tower of Spirits, Byrne, disbelieving, comments that he was beaten by two humans. Zelda, while still possessing a Phantom, says that when she and Link combine their strength, no one can defeat them. Link turns to her, surprised. The background turns white and Zelda's Lullaby plays as they both laugh and high-five, gazing at each other all the while. Toward the end of the game, before the final battle against Malladus, Zelda is reunited with her body, and is no longer able to levitate. Link runs underneath her to catch her as she falls, and she lands on top of him and knocks them both to the ground as well as knock Link out for a few seconds. Upon awakening, Zelda, overjoyed to have her body back, embraces Link, causing him to blush. Finally, after Malladus is defeated, Zelda and Link watch Anjean and Byrne's spirits ascend to the heavens. The camera then lowers to show Zelda and Link holding hands while Zelda's Lullaby plays in the background. After the credits, a short cut scene shows Zelda gazing at a picture of Link on the Spirit Train with her flying beside him, which she keeps on her desk. she may also wave at Link depending on his answer to a question Zelda asked before.

Skyward Sword has several noticeable romantic moments between Link and Zelda. Early in the game, Zelda wants Link to be the first to see her outfit for the Wing Ceremony. She worries over him and she does not want him to fail at becoming a knight. When Link's Crimson Loftwing is hidden by Groose, Zelda assists Link in finding his Loftwing. After Link wins the Wing Ceremony, Zelda jumps off the ledge and Link catches her almost as if she was expecting him to. She then congratulates him on winning. Afterwards, Zelda mentions that she is very happy to be atop the Statue of the Goddess with him. She also gets extremely close to him and almost implies that the two are to kiss, before she pushes him off the statue. Afterward, Zelda bashfully asks Link to go out flying which they do. She then tells Link how amazing the day was, and that she would remember it forever. At the Temple of Hylia, when Zelda states she must seal herself to keep Demise in place, she sheds tears of sadness and states before all this, she was happy just being with Link on Skyloft, demonstrating a deep level of feelings for Link. Link desperately tries to stop her and when she is sealed, Link lowers his head in sadness, showing his deep feelings for her. Much later in the game, when Link releases Zelda from her sealed state, Link runs up and catches her from falling and both of them hug and walk out smiling at each other, holding hands, before Ghirahim ruins the tender moment. During the ending, Zelda asks what Link will do now. Link sweetly smiles at her while their Loftwings fly off toward the sky, implying that he chose to stay on the Surface to live with Zelda.

A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.

The game creators also seem to be fond of the idea of romance between the characters.[1]

Though never directly stated in-game, Shigeru Miyamoto revealed in an interview conducted by Famimaga 64 that Navi is jealous of Princess Zelda and has feelings for Link.[2]

Another less popular theory among fans is that Link and Zelda are related by blood, either as siblings or more distantly. Even though rumors to this effect started with the infamous "Save the Princess... Zelda is your... ... ..." line from A Link to the Past (later reported as a mistranslation), the theory generally revolves around the Link and Zelda from Ocarina of Time.

A possible indication of a blood relation between the two in Ocarina of Time is their physical resemblance: they both have blonde hair, blue eyes, and similar facial features. They also have similarly shaped heads. Graphics limitations could be responsible for some of this similarity, however. Certain dialogue could also be perceived as implying a blood relation: the ghost Sharp comments that Link reminds him of Zelda, and that Link "may have some connection with the Royal Family".[3] Link's connection to the Royal Family is highlighted throughout the game, with Link often playing Zelda's Lullaby to verify it. The fact that Impa agrees to teach a strange boy a song only Royal Family members are allowed to know could also be interpreted as a hint at Link's blood relation to Hyrule's Royal Family. [4]

Additionally, Zelda seems to recognize Link's name upon their first meeting.[5] This could be attributed to her prophetic abilities, although the boy in her dreams seemed to be a largely abstract figure, with no defining traits aside from the presence of a guardian Fairy and a Spiritual Stone. This line of dialogue has often been regarded as a sign that the two have met before, although this could only have occurred when Link was a baby per the Deku Tree Sprout's account of Link's coming to Kokiri Forest. It is also worth noting that while the King of Hyrule is clearly identified as Zelda's father, no mention is made of a Queen. Meanwhile, Link's mother is stated to have died shortly after reaching the forest, but no information is given concerning his father. Given these facts, it is possible that Zelda and Link share the same parents, making them siblings.

ReDeadEdit

"During Ganondorf's dark reign, many evil beings walked the earth, but none were as horrible as
ReDead
the ReDead. These skeletal creatures froze people who strayed too close, then they sucked the life from the unfortunate victims."

— Nintendo Power Player's Guide description ReDeads (リーデッド Rīdeddo?) are recurring enemies in the Legend of Zelda series. They are highly emaciated, undead humanoid creatures, closely resembling zombies. They are found in dark and distant locations such as Hidden Holes and dungeons. ReDeads are capable of completely halting the movement of their prey with their gaze when they come close; concurrently, they emit blood-curdling screams to terrify their unfortunate victim. They will then close in on their stunned victim, and in most games will attach to them to drain their life energy. ReDeads are considered to be among the most frightening enemies of the Legend of Zelda series.

OriginEdit

It is possible that ReDeads were once regular, deceased Hylians who happened to be re-animated through exposure to dark magic, or that they are, like Poes, restless spirits wandering the world of the living. Considering the abundance of ReDeads found in the devastated Hyrule Castle Town of the future, as well as underneath the Kakariko Graveyard and inside the Shadow Temple, this theory seems plausible.

Burial CustomsEdit

The differences in appearance and habits between the different incarnations of ReDeads may suggest changes in burial customs over the passing of time. ReDeads found in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask are sometimes encountered underneath graves, and appear to be wearing carved Spooky Masks over their faces. ReDeads found in The Wind Waker are decidedly teal-colored. Since these corpses were all buried below sea level, it is possible they were punished for evil doings, and forced to haunt Hyrule forever.

Sacred GroveEdit

It is possible that the Sacred Grove was originally the first Hyrule Castle Town, as evidenced
Sacred Grove
by what appears to be a town square where the Skull Kid battles Link as well as the short walk off the square to the Temple of Time's ruins, which matches the original Hyrule Castle Town's distance to the Temple of Time in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. After the Gerudo attack led by Ganondorf, it is possible that the capital was too badly damaged in the attack and was abandoned, but the Lost Woods could have had a portal leading to the original area as it had various portals in it leading all around Hyrule originally, such as those leading to Goron City and Zora's Domain in Ocarina of Time and even one leading to the land of Termina in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. However, it seems unlikely as the town square area is the only sign of civilization besides the Temple of Time, whereas the Castle Town in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was much larger.

It is also possible that this area is the crippled remains of the original Forest Temple from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. The destroyed wall with Spinner tracks greatly resembles the central room in the Forest Temple and the center pillar that the Skull Kid stands atop could be the remains of the central Elevator, with the underground Hidden Hole being the overgrown basement. In addition, Saria's Song is heard while in the grove.

Sacred RealmEdit

"In a realm beyond sight the sky shines gold, not blue. There, the Triforce's might makes mortal dreams come true." — Book of Mudora verse

The Sacred Realm (聖地 Seichi?, Sacred Land), also referred to as the Golden Land, is a
Sacred Realm
recurring location in the The Legend of Zelda series. The Sacred Realm is described as a mythical plane, or parallel world, created along with Hyrule by the three Golden Goddesses. It is the resting place of the Triforce, an artifact of great power left by the Goddesses. Though the Sacred Realm is linked to Hyrule, the way to access it and acquire the Triforce within is shrouded in secrecy.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

The backstory of A Link to the Past has many similarities to the events of Ocarina of Time. The name "Seven Wise Men" from A Link to the Past is actually a mistranslation, with the original Japanese and later English re-releases giving them the same name as the Seven Sages from Ocarina of Time. Two of Ocarina of Time's developers, character designer Satoru Takizawa and script director Toru Osawa, even stated that the Imprisoning War and Seven Sages mentioned by A Link to the Past were the same events and characters seen in Ocarina of Time. Despite this, there are some details which conflict between the two accounts. Many fans consider these details to be retconed in the face of overall similarities and developer confirmation, while others maintain that the two games are describing separate events and characters.

Silent RealmEdit

The Silent Realm from The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is theorized to be the Sacred Realm. In Skyward Sword, Link obtains all three pieces of the Triforce in a place which appears to be the Silent Realm, given the area's identical appearance, method of entry, and Link's lack of items in the area. Because the stories of the creation of Hyrule state that the Triforce was left in the Sacred Realm, it would make sense that in Skyward Sword, which is generally accepted as the first game in the chronology of the series, the Triforce would be found in the Sacred Realm. The Silent Realm also changes to appear golden upon Link's acquisition of the full Triforce, similar to the Sacred Realm's description as the "Golden Land". However, the nature of the Silent Realm is distinctly different from that of the Sacred Realm. While both are equivalent worlds to Hyrule, the Silent Realm is a spirit world which only Link can enter, leaving Fi, his items, and his own physical body behind. The Sacred Realm, however, is a normal physical world, which any person can enter with their own body and equipment.

Skull Kid(Character)Edit

It is widely believed—and heavily implied in Majora's Mask—that the Skull Kids in Ocarina of
Skull Kid3
Time and Majora's Mask are one and the same. While no outright statement is ever made regarding this, it seems beyond a reasonable doubt this is what the games' creators intended.

Firstly, upon encountering Link in the Lost Woods after having ambushed him, the Skull Kid appears to recognize Link, but deems it not to be a problem. Later, after the Skull Kid is removed from the influence of Majora's Mask, he tells Link that he smells the same as "that fairy kid who taught [him] that song in the woods": in Ocarina of Time, Link plays "Saria's Song" to a Skull Kid in the Lost Woods, who becomes his friend after this.

Additionally, Link sells the Skull Mask to this same Skull Kid, indicating a preexisting interest for masks which could have motivated the Skull Kid's theft of Majora's Mask. Lastly, after the end credits of Majora's Mask, the final image shown is a stump bearing carvings of the Skull Kid, Link, Tatl, Tael, and the Four Giants. After a certain amount of time passes, part of "Saria's Song" will play.

It is also possible that this Skull Kid is either the same Skull Kid, or an ancestor to the Skull Kid from The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. This is supported by the fact that that Skull Kid knows "Saria's Song".

Sky WritingEdit

Sky Writing is similar to Hylian writing, meaning some of the language the Hylians learned may have been adopted from the Oocca.

Split TimelineEdit

It is speculated by some that alternate worlds such as the Twilight Realm and Termina may be unaffected by the timeline split. However, while these two realms are alternate dimensions, there is no evidence to support the idea that they exist outside of linear time. Both realms have demonstrated the ability to receive beings from the Child Timeline and return them to the Child Timeline when they exit back into Hyrule. There is no reason to believe that these two realms would only exist as a single timeline, or that they could "prioritize" inputs from one timeline, and later output these into both the timelines.

In addition, the renowned Youtube show, Game Theory, dismissed the Zelda Timeline, particularly the Defeat Timeline (in where Link fails on his quest) on the grounds that "the hero cannot be simultaneously victorious and defeated". Elaborating, he explained that with Link defeating Gannondorf, two perfectly possible timelines are created; However if Link dies at any point in his journey another separate timeline is created. Explaining that the only way for all 3 timelines to exist is the Many Worlds Theory (the theory that all possible pasts and futures exist in separate timelines).

StallordEdit

"You still live... How astonishing. No wonder some call you "hero". But this is truly a bittersweet reunion... Truly! For I fear this is the last time I will see you alive!" — Zant

Twilit Fossil, Stallord (蘇生古代竜 ハーラ・ジガント Sosei Kodai Ryū Hāra-Jiganto?, Resurrected
Stallord
Ancient Dragon Hahra Gigant) is the boss of the Arbiter's Grounds, the fourth dungeon in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. Stallord is the skeleton of a dead beast found inside the Arbiter's Grounds. It has a roughly humanoid upper body protruding from a pit of sand, and a horned animal head comparable to a goat or dragon. Its lower body is never seen; in fact, whether its lower portions were even present at the time is unknown. Several weapons are embedded in the beast's skull, possibly the cause of its death. The music played during the battle against Stallord incorporates, partly, reinstrumentalized versions of the music played during the battles against King Dodongo and Volvagia in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. By name, it is the king of the Stalfos in Arbiter's Grounds.

VolvagiaEdit

Stallord may be the dragon Volvagia from Ocarina of Time, as he was never revived in the Twilight Princess timeline and has a very similar appearance (aside from being only a skeleton), abilities (fire breathing) and the same music. However, this seems unlikely, as Stallord is considerably bigger than Volvagia was, and Stallord is found in the Arbiter's Grounds which is directly across from Death Mountain where Volvagia had lived. There are also physical differences such as Stallord having some hair around its neck, while Volvagia had a mane of flames; Stallord's dental structure differs from Volvagia's; Stallord has ten digits in all while Volvagia only has six; and Stallord has relatively long arms, while Volvagia's in comparison are very short.

Another way Stallord could have been Volvagia is that technically, Link never fought Volvagia in the first place. Due to Princess Zelda sending Link back in time, and Link stopping Ganondorf from taking the Triforce of Power, Volvagia was never killed by Link in the child timeline. Some believe that as a last resort, Ganondorf created a few monsters (one being Volvagia) but was arrested by the Sages. The reason Stallord was in Arbiter's Grounds may be because Volvagia couldn't be killed, so they sealed it inside its chamber to keep it from doing any harm. How Volvagia died however, is a different story. It very well could have been starvation. The vast numbers of Staltroops seemed to wear similar armor to the Knights of Hyrule, so they may have been the warriors that died helping to take down and seal up Volvagia.

King DodongoEdit

o a theory that Stallord is King Dodongo, another boss from Ocarina of Time, which is reptilian in appearance, similarly to Stallord. Sections of the music played during the boss battle against King Dodongo are reused during the battle against Stallord. However, this theory is also discredited based on several physical differences (arm length, digit number, general proportion of limbs, torso, hair and head). Also, the Desert and the Mountains are very far apart, and when King Dodongo was defeated, his body was apparently trapped in the lava of his own chamber.

Dark DragonEdit

It is also possible that Stallord is based on General Onox's Dark Dragon form from The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons. The body proportions, in terms of arm length, horn size and shape, and facial structure, are quite similar. In addition, Stallord's lack of a lower half rings similar to how Onox has a tail and no hind legs. However, the Dark Dragon only has four fingers, unlike Stallord, and also had wings, which Stallord lacks (although they may have been buried in the sand before the events in the game). Also the Dark Dragon only seems to have eight teeth during its boss fight, unlike Stallord, which has ten teeth (although arguably, not all of the Dark Dragon's teeth were seen). Lastly, Holodrum and Hyrule are very far apart. However, it should be noted that Onox's speech before the final battle implies that he was actually native to the Dark Realm and not to Holodrum.

Execution BeastEdit

Another possibility is that Stallord was used for execution when the Arbiter's Grounds were still in use, due to Stallord's chamber being situated directly beneath the chamber where those condemned were banished to the Twilight Realm. The chamber itself seems like it was designed so that several people would be placed on the pillar and lowered to the bottom where Stallord would subsequently devour them. Supporting this is the abundance of Staltroops, being animated skeletons, which are theorized to be prisoners killed by Stallord.

Other OriginsEdit

Another possibility is that Stallord was simply an unnamed monster killed prior to the game by another hero. Throughout the Arbiter's Grounds, wall engravings show a figure with a shield fighting a large monster, possibly Stallord, which may suggest that Stallord's first death was because of an ancient hero and not of natural causes. Shapes similar to Stallord's head are on all the doors in the Arbiter's Grounds.

The chamber Stallord is found in shares a couple of shapes similar to the Sealed Grounds in Skyward Sword: downward-pointed cone (although this is not the shape of the chamber itself, but rather of the sand during the first part of the battle), and spiral (the tracks Link rides, and the edge of the Sealed Grounds pit). Stallord also has a sharp object embedded in the top of it's skull, a similarity it shares with Demise. It may be that the game's designers intended to infer that the two bosses are somehow linked, or were merely drawing on a previous game for design. The similarities could also be purely coincidental. In SS the Sealed Grounds and Gerudo are far apart, diminishing the likelihood that Stallord is Demise's remains.

Tetra's Pirates(Wind Waker)Edit

It is possible that each crew member is a reincarnation and/or descendant of one of the Royal
Tetra&#039;s Pirates
Family of Hyrule's aides. This is supported by the fact that each person seen with Zelda in the painting found in Hyrule Castle has an almost exact resemblance to a member of the crew. Considering that Tetra is Princess Zelda, a descendant of the Royal Family, and that the pirates are all Hylian despite that race being rare on the Great Sea, it is likely that the pirates could be the successors of the individuals in the aforementioned painting.

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